2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159661
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Older frail women’s lifelines: Contemplating, connecting, and temporizing
Abstract:
Older frail women’s lifelines: Contemplating, connecting, and temporizing
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Porter, Eileen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri-Columbia
Title:Chair, Nursing
Contact Address:Sinclair School of Nursing, S424 Nursing Building, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA
Contact Telephone:573.884.7261
Increasing numbers of frail older women have personal emergency response systems (PERS or "lifelines"), but few researchers have explored experiences related to PERS. During a longitudinal phenomenological study of older widows' home care experience (funded by NIH), PERS-related interview data were analyzed. Of the 25 women (aged 80-96), 19 had specific characteristics of frailty, and 11 of those women had a history of falls or "black-outs." Of the 19 frail women, 7 women had PERS. Of the 12 women without PERS, 1woman had discontinued it, 5 were considering it, and 1woman got a mobile telephone instead. With or without PERS, the women were trying to "get helpers here quickly when I need them," but otherwise, there was great variability in their experiences. Most women with PERS thought they needed it, but they did not always use it in crises; their experience was one of "living with something that has a mind of its own." Women who stopped using PERS or chose not to do so were (a) not convinced that they needed it or (b) concerned about intrusion and expense. Older women's experiences with PERS should be monitored to promote better use. Interventions are needed to counteract barriers to use.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOlder frail women’s lifelines: Contemplating, connecting, and temporizingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159661-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Older frail women&rsquo;s lifelines: Contemplating, connecting, and temporizing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Porter, Eileen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri-Columbia</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Chair, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Sinclair School of Nursing, S424 Nursing Building, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">573.884.7261</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">porterew@missouri.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Increasing numbers of frail older women have personal emergency response systems (PERS or &quot;lifelines&quot;), but few researchers have explored experiences related to PERS. During a longitudinal phenomenological study of older widows' home care experience (funded by NIH), PERS-related interview data were analyzed. Of the 25 women (aged 80-96), 19 had specific characteristics of frailty, and 11 of those women had a history of falls or &quot;black-outs.&quot; Of the 19 frail women, 7 women had PERS. Of the 12 women without PERS, 1woman had discontinued it, 5 were considering it, and 1woman got a mobile telephone instead. With or without PERS, the women were trying to &quot;get helpers here quickly when I need them,&quot; but otherwise, there was great variability in their experiences. Most women with PERS thought they needed it, but they did not always use it in crises; their experience was one of &quot;living with something that has a mind of its own.&quot; Women who stopped using PERS or chose not to do so were (a) not convinced that they needed it or (b) concerned about intrusion and expense. Older women's experiences with PERS should be monitored to promote better use. Interventions are needed to counteract barriers to use.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:13:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:13:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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