2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159662
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Images of nursing in hospital brochures: A discourse analysis
Abstract:
Images of nursing in hospital brochures: A discourse analysis
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Powers, Penny
P.I. Institution Name:South Dakota State University
Contact Address:College of Nursing, PO Box 2275, Brookings, SD, 57007-0098, USA
Contact Telephone:605.688.4115
The purpose of the research was to perform a discourse analysis on the depiction of nursing in a sample of brochures from U.S. hospitals. Discourse analysis is a type of philosophical analysis in the tradition of post-modern feminism in which the researcher aims to determine the dominant discourse(s) used to describe the topic in the text under consideration. Requests for brochures were sent to 1374 randomly selected hospitals over 50 beds in the U.S. Three hundred thirty-two hospitals responded with brochures, newsletters, reports, and other material. The dominant discourse in the brochures is the discourse of the discipline of marketing. The major words used to describe nursing in these hospitals are "quality" and "care". One resistance discourse was identified: the discourse of patients' rights. The conclusions of this analysis are the following: Nurses are more or less visible according to their status. The closer to medicine or administration, the more visible the nurse. The voice of nursing is strong in the hospital brochures because consumers believe that the quality of a hospital is related to the quality of nursing care. Nursing benefits by the dominance of the marketing discourse only insofar as nursing remains a consumer concern.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImages of nursing in hospital brochures: A discourse analysisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159662-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Images of nursing in hospital brochures: A discourse analysis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Powers, Penny</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">South Dakota State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, PO Box 2275, Brookings, SD, 57007-0098, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">605.688.4115</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Penny_Powers@sdstate.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of the research was to perform a discourse analysis on the depiction of nursing in a sample of brochures from U.S. hospitals. Discourse analysis is a type of philosophical analysis in the tradition of post-modern feminism in which the researcher aims to determine the dominant discourse(s) used to describe the topic in the text under consideration. Requests for brochures were sent to 1374 randomly selected hospitals over 50 beds in the U.S. Three hundred thirty-two hospitals responded with brochures, newsletters, reports, and other material. The dominant discourse in the brochures is the discourse of the discipline of marketing. The major words used to describe nursing in these hospitals are &quot;quality&quot; and &quot;care&quot;. One resistance discourse was identified: the discourse of patients' rights. The conclusions of this analysis are the following: Nurses are more or less visible according to their status. The closer to medicine or administration, the more visible the nurse. The voice of nursing is strong in the hospital brochures because consumers believe that the quality of a hospital is related to the quality of nursing care. Nursing benefits by the dominance of the marketing discourse only insofar as nursing remains a consumer concern.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:13:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:13:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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