Randomized controlled trial of early kangaroo (skin-to-skin) care effects on maternal feelings, maternal-infant interaction and breastfeeding success in Thailand

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159663
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Randomized controlled trial of early kangaroo (skin-to-skin) care effects on maternal feelings, maternal-infant interaction and breastfeeding success in Thailand
Abstract:
Randomized controlled trial of early kangaroo (skin-to-skin) care effects on maternal feelings, maternal-infant interaction and breastfeeding success in Thailand
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Punthmatharith, Busakorn
P.I. Institution Name:Prince of Songkla University
Contact Address:Faculty of Nursing, Hat Yai, Songkla, 90112, Thailand
This randomized trial was guided by Anderson’s Mutual Caregiving Model (1977) and Klaus and Kennell’s Theory of Bonding (1976). At Hat Yai Hospital in Thailand, 160 consenting mother-fullterm infant dyads were studied to determine effects of early kangaroo care (EKC) on maternal feelings, maternal-infant interaction, and breastfeeding success. Dyads were randomly assigned with minimization to EKC or control groups. In EKC, mothers hold their diapered infants skin-to-skin and chest-to-chest. EKC mothers began EKC at approximately 60 minutes postbirth, continued as much as desired on Days 1 and 2 or until discharge, and were encouraged to continue at home. Control mothers held their wrapped or clothed infants as much as desired. Maternal feelings were measured with the Maternal-Infant Bonding Questionnaire on Day 2 and four weeks later. Similarly, breastfeeding success was measured with the Index of Breastfeeding Status, the H & H Lactation Scale, and infant weight; maternal-infant interaction was measured with the Bonding Observation Check List on Day 2. Data for presentation at MNRS will be analyzed using SEM, MANOVA, and descriptive statistics. If EKC does facilitate maternal feelings, maternal-infant interaction, and breastfeeding success, these data can be used to improve postpartum care and the health of mothers and infants.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRandomized controlled trial of early kangaroo (skin-to-skin) care effects on maternal feelings, maternal-infant interaction and breastfeeding success in Thailanden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159663-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Randomized controlled trial of early kangaroo (skin-to-skin) care effects on maternal feelings, maternal-infant interaction and breastfeeding success in Thailand</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Punthmatharith, Busakorn</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Prince of Songkla University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Faculty of Nursing, Hat Yai, Songkla, 90112, Thailand</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This randomized trial was guided by Anderson&rsquo;s Mutual Caregiving Model (1977) and Klaus and Kennell&rsquo;s Theory of Bonding (1976). At Hat Yai Hospital in Thailand, 160 consenting mother-fullterm infant dyads were studied to determine effects of early kangaroo care (EKC) on maternal feelings, maternal-infant interaction, and breastfeeding success. Dyads were randomly assigned with minimization to EKC or control groups. In EKC, mothers hold their diapered infants skin-to-skin and chest-to-chest. EKC mothers began EKC at approximately 60 minutes postbirth, continued as much as desired on Days 1 and 2 or until discharge, and were encouraged to continue at home. Control mothers held their wrapped or clothed infants as much as desired. Maternal feelings were measured with the Maternal-Infant Bonding Questionnaire on Day 2 and four weeks later. Similarly, breastfeeding success was measured with the Index of Breastfeeding Status, the H &amp; H Lactation Scale, and infant weight; maternal-infant interaction was measured with the Bonding Observation Check List on Day 2. Data for presentation at MNRS will be analyzed using SEM, MANOVA, and descriptive statistics. If EKC does facilitate maternal feelings, maternal-infant interaction, and breastfeeding success, these data can be used to improve postpartum care and the health of mothers and infants.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:13:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:13:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.