2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159665
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Safer sex behaviors in African-American and Caucasian college students
Abstract:
Safer sex behaviors in African-American and Caucasian college students
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Ransom, Jane, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Medical College of Ohio
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3000 Arlington Avenue, Toledo, OH, 43614, USA
Contact Telephone:419.383.5844
Among 25-44 year-olds, HIV infection remains the leading cause of death among African-Americans and fifth among Caucasians. Nurses facilitate prevention by promoting safer sex behaviors. This descriptive study identified factors related to safer sex behaviors in African-American and Caucasian college students. African-Americans represented 57% of the sample (N=412). Orem's self-care deficit theory provided the theoretical framework. Basic conditioning factors included: gender, ethnicity, social network, social support specific to safer sex behaviors. Self-care agency included: capabilities for general health promotion, attitudes toward alcohol and condom use, self-efficacy to discuss sexual history with a partner and use condoms. Safer sex behaviors represented self-care. African-American students had less positive attitudes about alcohol, but more positive attitudes about condom use and self-efficacy to discuss sexual history and use condoms. Women had less positive attitudes toward alcohol than men, but more positive attitudes about condoms. Those with social support for using safer sex behaviors had more capabilities for general health promotion and positive attitudes toward alcohol and condom use. Study variables accounted for 43% of variance in safer sex behaviors. Significant predictors were: social support specific to safer sex behaviors, attitudes toward condom use, and self-efficacy to discuss sexual history and use condoms.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSafer sex behaviors in African-American and Caucasian college studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159665-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Safer sex behaviors in African-American and Caucasian college students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ransom, Jane, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Medical College of Ohio</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3000 Arlington Avenue, Toledo, OH, 43614, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">419.383.5844 </td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jransom@mco.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Among 25-44 year-olds, HIV infection remains the leading cause of death among African-Americans and fifth among Caucasians. Nurses facilitate prevention by promoting safer sex behaviors. This descriptive study identified factors related to safer sex behaviors in African-American and Caucasian college students. African-Americans represented 57% of the sample (N=412). Orem's self-care deficit theory provided the theoretical framework. Basic conditioning factors included: gender, ethnicity, social network, social support specific to safer sex behaviors. Self-care agency included: capabilities for general health promotion, attitudes toward alcohol and condom use, self-efficacy to discuss sexual history with a partner and use condoms. Safer sex behaviors represented self-care. African-American students had less positive attitudes about alcohol, but more positive attitudes about condom use and self-efficacy to discuss sexual history and use condoms. Women had less positive attitudes toward alcohol than men, but more positive attitudes about condoms. Those with social support for using safer sex behaviors had more capabilities for general health promotion and positive attitudes toward alcohol and condom use. Study variables accounted for 43% of variance in safer sex behaviors. Significant predictors were: social support specific to safer sex behaviors, attitudes toward condom use, and self-efficacy to discuss sexual history and use condoms.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:13:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:13:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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