2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159669
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Stress symptoms reported by school-age children
Abstract:
Stress symptoms reported by school-age children
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Ryan-Wenger, Nancy, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Ohio State University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 1585 Neil Avenue, 346 Newton Hall, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA
Contact Telephone:614.292.4800
Stress in children can exacerbate symptoms of chronic illnesses such as diabetes, asthma and JRA. Emotional and physiologic stress responses are normally protective, but if continuous, may develop into chronic conditions including depression, colitis, or ulcers. Nursing interventions are needed to mitigate stress-related symptoms in children, but there is little documentation about the characteristics of these symptoms, and no comprehensive self-report measures are available. The purpose of this study, based on Lazarus’ theories of stress, coping and emotion, was to determine in children’s own words, symptoms that they experience in response to stressors. The sample (n=194; ages 7-12) represented rural, inner city and parochial schools. Group discussion and individual questionnaires resulted in 470 stress symptoms that were inductively sorted into Cognitive/Emotional Responses (n=265; 56.4%) and Physiological Responses (n=205, 43.6%). The most common cognitive/emotional responses were mad, worried, cry or feel sad, nervous, and afraid. The most common physiological responses were headache, stomachache, sweaty, heart beats fast or feels funny, and feeling sick. Autonomic and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis changes are reflected in the children’s responses. Most stress responses are not observable by others, therefore self-report measures are important. These data will be used to develop a stress symptom measure for school-age children.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStress symptoms reported by school-age childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159669-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Stress symptoms reported by school-age children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ryan-Wenger, Nancy, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Ohio State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 1585 Neil Avenue, 346 Newton Hall, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">614.292.4800</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ryan-wenger.10@osu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Stress in children can exacerbate symptoms of chronic illnesses such as diabetes, asthma and JRA. Emotional and physiologic stress responses are normally protective, but if continuous, may develop into chronic conditions including depression, colitis, or ulcers. Nursing interventions are needed to mitigate stress-related symptoms in children, but there is little documentation about the characteristics of these symptoms, and no comprehensive self-report measures are available. The purpose of this study, based on Lazarus&rsquo; theories of stress, coping and emotion, was to determine in children&rsquo;s own words, symptoms that they experience in response to stressors. The sample (n=194; ages 7-12) represented rural, inner city and parochial schools. Group discussion and individual questionnaires resulted in 470 stress symptoms that were inductively sorted into Cognitive/Emotional Responses (n=265; 56.4%) and Physiological Responses (n=205, 43.6%). The most common cognitive/emotional responses were mad, worried, cry or feel sad, nervous, and afraid. The most common physiological responses were headache, stomachache, sweaty, heart beats fast or feels funny, and feeling sick. Autonomic and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis changes are reflected in the children&rsquo;s responses. Most stress responses are not observable by others, therefore self-report measures are important. These data will be used to develop a stress symptom measure for school-age children.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:13:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:13:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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