2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159672
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Depression and health in older women
Abstract:
Depression and health in older women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Martsolf, Donna
P.I. Institution Name:Kent State University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, PO Box 5190, Kent, OH, 44242-0001, USA
Contact Telephone:330.672.7930
Depression is a significant health problem especially for older women. Using the integrative model of depression, this study's purpose was to determine: (1) if the relationship between depression and codependency found in previous studies (Hughes-Hammer & Martsolf, 1998) would replicate, (2) prevalence of depression in older women, and (3) which health variables would best predict depression scores. Survey design was used with a sample of 248 women ages 65 to 94 years attending community social clubs. Subjects completed the Beck Depression Inventory, Codependency Assessment Tool, Quality of Life Scale, Perceived Health Report, Measurement of Patient Functional Abilities, Illness Prevention Screening Behaviors Checklist, and self-report of current medications. As in previous studies, depression and codependency were significantly correlated (r=.51, p<.0001). Statistically significant correlations existed between depression and functional ability, perceived health, quality of life and medication use (p<.0001 for each comparison). Of these women, 7% had moderate or severe depression. Using ANOVA, quality of life, functional abilities and perceived health had significant positive effect on depression scores (p<.01,=.05). Nursing interventions should be aimed at screening for depression in women in primary health care settings by assessing functional abilities, quality of life, and perceived health.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDepression and health in older womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159672-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Depression and health in older women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Martsolf, Donna</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kent State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, PO Box 5190, Kent, OH, 44242-0001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330.672.7930</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dmartsol@kent.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Depression is a significant health problem especially for older women. Using the integrative model of depression, this study's purpose was to determine: (1) if the relationship between depression and codependency found in previous studies (Hughes-Hammer &amp; Martsolf, 1998) would replicate, (2) prevalence of depression in older women, and (3) which health variables would best predict depression scores. Survey design was used with a sample of 248 women ages 65 to 94 years attending community social clubs. Subjects completed the Beck Depression Inventory, Codependency Assessment Tool, Quality of Life Scale, Perceived Health Report, Measurement of Patient Functional Abilities, Illness Prevention Screening Behaviors Checklist, and self-report of current medications. As in previous studies, depression and codependency were significantly correlated (r=.51, p&lt;.0001). Statistically significant correlations existed between depression and functional ability, perceived health, quality of life and medication use (p&lt;.0001 for each comparison). Of these women, 7% had moderate or severe depression. Using ANOVA, quality of life, functional abilities and perceived health had significant positive effect on depression scores (p&lt;.01,=.05). Nursing interventions should be aimed at screening for depression in women in primary health care settings by assessing functional abilities, quality of life, and perceived health.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:13:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:13:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.