The effect of self-selected music during colonoscopy on anxiety, heart rate and blood pressure

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159674
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The effect of self-selected music during colonoscopy on anxiety, heart rate and blood pressure
Abstract:
The effect of self-selected music during colonoscopy on anxiety, heart rate and blood pressure
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Singer, Lynda
P.I. Institution Name:Medical College of Ohio
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3000 Arlington Avenue, Toledo, OH, 43614, USA
Contact Telephone:419.383.6731
The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of music therapy on self-reported and physiological signs of anxiety among ambulatory patients undergoing colonoscopy. Thirty-two patients were randomly assigned to either an experimental group who listened to music during the colonoscopy or a standard procedure no music control group. Prior to and following the procedure, subjects completed the State Anxiety Inventory. Physiological signs of anxiety, including heard rate and blood pressure were monitored at four time points during the procedure. Repeated measures ANOVA indicated a significant group by time interaction on the physiological signs of anxiety. Post hoc analysis indicated that heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure significantly decreased among the music intervention group during the procedure while remaining unchanged in the control group. No significant effect of the treatment was observed on the State Anxiety Inventory although a trend indicated that the music intervention decreased state anxiety. Finally, the group who received the music intervention required less physician administrated sedation during the procedure than did the control group. These findings indicate that music therapy has the potential to reduce physiological indicators of anxiety and the need for sedation among individuals undergoing a colonoscopy.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe effect of self-selected music during colonoscopy on anxiety, heart rate and blood pressureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159674-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The effect of self-selected music during colonoscopy on anxiety, heart rate and blood pressure</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Singer, Lynda</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Medical College of Ohio</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3000 Arlington Avenue, Toledo, OH, 43614, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">419.383.6731</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lsinger@mco.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of music therapy on self-reported and physiological signs of anxiety among ambulatory patients undergoing colonoscopy. Thirty-two patients were randomly assigned to either an experimental group who listened to music during the colonoscopy or a standard procedure no music control group. Prior to and following the procedure, subjects completed the State Anxiety Inventory. Physiological signs of anxiety, including heard rate and blood pressure were monitored at four time points during the procedure. Repeated measures ANOVA indicated a significant group by time interaction on the physiological signs of anxiety. Post hoc analysis indicated that heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure significantly decreased among the music intervention group during the procedure while remaining unchanged in the control group. No significant effect of the treatment was observed on the State Anxiety Inventory although a trend indicated that the music intervention decreased state anxiety. Finally, the group who received the music intervention required less physician administrated sedation during the procedure than did the control group. These findings indicate that music therapy has the potential to reduce physiological indicators of anxiety and the need for sedation among individuals undergoing a colonoscopy.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:13:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:13:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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