2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159675
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison of advanced practice nurses and hospital staff nurses
Abstract:
Comparison of advanced practice nurses and hospital staff nurses
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Smith, Kristin
P.I. Institution Name:University of Cincinnati
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 405 Procter Hall, PO Box 210038, Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0038, USA
Contact Telephone:513.558.0311
The purpose of this secondary analysis study was to compare common characteristics among the types of Ohio advanced practice nurses (APNs) as well as between APNs and non-APNs. This study was part of a larger study to examine the current nursing workforce in Ohio. A total of 1880 RNs and 261 LPNs responded. More nurses are employed in hospitals than any other setting, thus, they were chosen as the comparison group. Ninety-three APNs responded; 73 reported they are either Nurse Anesthetists (19), FNPs (12), PNP/NNPs (12) or CNS (30). Differences exist among these categories in initial preparation (NAs started with diplomas), age (FNPs youngest), employment patterns, settings and demographics. The differences in APNs and non-APNs exist primarily in their practice roles with non-APNs devoting 10% more time to patient care and less in research and teaching. APNs are younger and have a higher rate of employment. Fewer non-APNs are seeking work in nursing. Initial educational preparation was at a higher level for APNs and more reported degree attainment in a non-nursing field. The composition of nursing is changing as it enters a new millenium and is faced with a shortage of nurses.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison of advanced practice nurses and hospital staff nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159675-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparison of advanced practice nurses and hospital staff nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Smith, Kristin</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Cincinnati</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 405 Procter Hall, PO Box 210038, Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0038, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">513.558.0311</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">emike@email.uc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this secondary analysis study was to compare common characteristics among the types of Ohio advanced practice nurses (APNs) as well as between APNs and non-APNs. This study was part of a larger study to examine the current nursing workforce in Ohio. A total of 1880 RNs and 261 LPNs responded. More nurses are employed in hospitals than any other setting, thus, they were chosen as the comparison group. Ninety-three APNs responded; 73 reported they are either Nurse Anesthetists (19), FNPs (12), PNP/NNPs (12) or CNS (30). Differences exist among these categories in initial preparation (NAs started with diplomas), age (FNPs youngest), employment patterns, settings and demographics. The differences in APNs and non-APNs exist primarily in their practice roles with non-APNs devoting 10% more time to patient care and less in research and teaching. APNs are younger and have a higher rate of employment. Fewer non-APNs are seeking work in nursing. Initial educational preparation was at a higher level for APNs and more reported degree attainment in a non-nursing field. The composition of nursing is changing as it enters a new millenium and is faced with a shortage of nurses.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:13:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:13:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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