2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159679
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Familiarity among Asian Americans
Abstract:
Familiarity among Asian Americans
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Son, Gwi-Ryung
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Contact Address:School of Nursing 400 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Contact Telephone:734.763.7524
Among Asian elders, critical factors impacting health are language and cultural differences. People feel comfortable and increase social and functional abilities within familiar environments. The concept of familiarity (Kaplan & Kaplan, 1982) was used to conceptualize this study. The purposes of this survey are to: 1) examine the relationships among preference (P), daily usage (DU), and familiarity (F) for ethnic items, and 2) explore critical attributes of familiarity. A convenience sample of 133 Asian Americans (aged 44 ±12 yrs) was used. Among ethnic items, food and clothes had the highest and lowest mean scores in three areas (P, DU, and F), respectively. Perason's correlations between total scores of P/DU, P/F, and DU/ F were .74, .47, and .53 (p<.00), respectively. Among predictors (P, DU, years of stay in original country and U. S), familiarity was significantly predicted by DU (Beta=.43, p<.00). Results suggest that familiarity is a strong influence and that preference for and daily usage of ethnic items may be treated as the same domain in a normal population. However, further research is needed to examine these relationships in Asian elders with functional impairments; they may prefer ethnic items, but be unable to use them in daily life.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFamiliarity among Asian Americansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159679-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Familiarity among Asian Americans</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Son, Gwi-Ryung</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing 400 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734.763.7524</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">grson@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Among Asian elders, critical factors impacting health are language and cultural differences. People feel comfortable and increase social and functional abilities within familiar environments. The concept of familiarity (Kaplan &amp; Kaplan, 1982) was used to conceptualize this study. The purposes of this survey are to: 1) examine the relationships among preference (P), daily usage (DU), and familiarity (F) for ethnic items, and 2) explore critical attributes of familiarity. A convenience sample of 133 Asian Americans (aged 44 &plusmn;12 yrs) was used. Among ethnic items, food and clothes had the highest and lowest mean scores in three areas (P, DU, and F), respectively. Perason's correlations between total scores of P/DU, P/F, and DU/ F were .74, .47, and .53 (p&lt;.00), respectively. Among predictors (P, DU, years of stay in original country and U. S), familiarity was significantly predicted by DU (Beta=.43, p&lt;.00). Results suggest that familiarity is a strong influence and that preference for and daily usage of ethnic items may be treated as the same domain in a normal population. However, further research is needed to examine these relationships in Asian elders with functional impairments; they may prefer ethnic items, but be unable to use them in daily life.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:14:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:14:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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