Nurses’ descriptions of actual and ideal supervision of unlicensed assistive personnel

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159680
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses’ descriptions of actual and ideal supervision of unlicensed assistive personnel
Abstract:
Nurses’ descriptions of actual and ideal supervision of unlicensed assistive personnel
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Standing, Theresa, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Graduate Student
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
Contact Telephone:216.368.5990
As the use of Unlicensed Assistive Personnel (UAP) increases, so do nurses’ responsibilities in supervision. The purpose of this study was to examine nurses’ descriptions of the process of supervision of UAP. Thirty-five nurses were purposively selected from a larger sample of nurses in a study of delegation to UAP. The nurses for the phone interviews were selected from acute, long term and home care facilities from across the country and from a variety of educational preparations. Most nurses had more than 16 years experience. Twenty-six nurses participated in the 30-minute telephone interviews and were asked to describe their process of supervision of UAP, as well as the ideal process. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and were examined using content analysis managed with NUD*IST software. Analysis indicated that nurses believed the process of UAP supervision included five steps: training and educating, proper assignments, observation, evaluation and follow-up, and documentation of supervision. Observation was seen as the key component of supervision and could assume an active or passive role. Over one third of the nurses stated that the ideal situation would provide them with more time for supervision. Further research is needed to examine supervision differences across care settings.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses’ descriptions of actual and ideal supervision of unlicensed assistive personnelen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159680-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurses&rsquo; descriptions of actual and ideal supervision of unlicensed assistive personnel</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Standing, Theresa, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Graduate Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216.368.5990</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tss2@po.cwru.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">As the use of Unlicensed Assistive Personnel (UAP) increases, so do nurses&rsquo; responsibilities in supervision. The purpose of this study was to examine nurses&rsquo; descriptions of the process of supervision of UAP. Thirty-five nurses were purposively selected from a larger sample of nurses in a study of delegation to UAP. The nurses for the phone interviews were selected from acute, long term and home care facilities from across the country and from a variety of educational preparations. Most nurses had more than 16 years experience. Twenty-six nurses participated in the 30-minute telephone interviews and were asked to describe their process of supervision of UAP, as well as the ideal process. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and were examined using content analysis managed with NUD*IST software. Analysis indicated that nurses believed the process of UAP supervision included five steps: training and educating, proper assignments, observation, evaluation and follow-up, and documentation of supervision. Observation was seen as the key component of supervision and could assume an active or passive role. Over one third of the nurses stated that the ideal situation would provide them with more time for supervision. Further research is needed to examine supervision differences across care settings.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:14:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:14:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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