2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159681
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Memory function in Taiwanese American older adults
Abstract:
Memory function in Taiwanese American older adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Suen, Lee-Jen
P.I. Institution Name:University of Akron
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 209 Carroll Street, MGH 101, Akron, OH, 44325-3701, USA
Contact Telephone:330.972.5931
It is estimated that in 2030, 20.1% of the US population will be age 65 or older. The population of Asian Americans elders is growing rapidly, but few studies have been done in this population. Complaints of memory decline are much higher in persons aged 65 and older than in any other age group. Memory is required to maintain an independent life. The purpose of this descriptive correlational study is to investigate relationships among sleep, physical activities, depression, and memory self-efficacy, and memory in Taiwanese American older adults. A convenience sample of 47 female and 53 male Taiwanese Americans aged 60 to 88 was recruited from the New York area. Memory function was measured by the Extended Rivermead Behavioral Memory Test (ERBMT). The Pearson correlation coefficient indicated that memory self-efficacy correlated significantly with memory performance (r=.329, p <.01). Among control variables, age, gender, education, chronic illness, and health promotion drugs used correlated significantly with memory function. Age was the strongest predictor of memory function (r=-.54, p<.001). The research findings suggest that older adults do experience memory decline and that they may need more reminders when they are given instructions for medication or other health care procedures.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMemory function in Taiwanese American older adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159681-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Memory function in Taiwanese American older adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Suen, Lee-Jen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Akron</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 209 Carroll Street, MGH 101, Akron, OH, 44325-3701, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330.972.5931</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lsuen@uakron.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">It is estimated that in 2030, 20.1% of the US population will be age 65 or older. The population of Asian Americans elders is growing rapidly, but few studies have been done in this population. Complaints of memory decline are much higher in persons aged 65 and older than in any other age group. Memory is required to maintain an independent life. The purpose of this descriptive correlational study is to investigate relationships among sleep, physical activities, depression, and memory self-efficacy, and memory in Taiwanese American older adults. A convenience sample of 47 female and 53 male Taiwanese Americans aged 60 to 88 was recruited from the New York area. Memory function was measured by the Extended Rivermead Behavioral Memory Test (ERBMT). The Pearson correlation coefficient indicated that memory self-efficacy correlated significantly with memory performance (r=.329, p &lt;.01). Among control variables, age, gender, education, chronic illness, and health promotion drugs used correlated significantly with memory function. Age was the strongest predictor of memory function (r=-.54, p&lt;.001). The research findings suggest that older adults do experience memory decline and that they may need more reminders when they are given instructions for medication or other health care procedures.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:14:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:14:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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