2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159688
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Topical pharyngeal anesthesia in children during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy
Abstract:
Topical pharyngeal anesthesia in children during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Walsh, Sue
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois in Chicago
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:847.723.9419
Problem: Topical pharyngeal anesthesia applied prior to upper gastrointestinal (UGI) endoscopy is commonly used with reports of prolonged recovery time, aspiration risks and methemoglobinemia. Distaste, gagging, and numbing sensations are reported as negative experiences. Outcomes for efficacy are varied in studies with no research reported in children. Design: A randomized, double-blinded, placebo controlled trial of Benzocaine 20% administered by pharyngeal spray was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of using topical pharyngeal anesthesia in children (N=126) during UGI endoscopy with concurrent IV sedation. Analysis Independent t-test and Chi-square were used to compare sample characteristics. Number of gags, ease of intubation and "faces" scores were compared between groups using the Mann-Whitney U test. The children's perception of their experience was examined using the Wong-Baker Faces visual analogue scale and a take home questionnaire analyzed by using a chi-square test. Findings: There was no significant difference in the efficacy of using topical pharyngeal anesthesia between the two groups, as measured by the number of gags (p=.390) and ease of endoscopic intubation (p=.877). Topical pharyngeal spray was perceived as unpleasant, with no significant difference between the two groups (p=.715). Recommendations for improving patient care during UGI endoscopy are made applying the Walsh conceptual model of intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTopical pharyngeal anesthesia in children during upper gastrointestinal endoscopyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159688-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Topical pharyngeal anesthesia in children during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Walsh, Sue</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois in Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">847.723.9419</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">SWalshRN@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Topical pharyngeal anesthesia applied prior to upper gastrointestinal (UGI) endoscopy is commonly used with reports of prolonged recovery time, aspiration risks and methemoglobinemia. Distaste, gagging, and numbing sensations are reported as negative experiences. Outcomes for efficacy are varied in studies with no research reported in children. Design: A randomized, double-blinded, placebo controlled trial of Benzocaine 20% administered by pharyngeal spray was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of using topical pharyngeal anesthesia in children (N=126) during UGI endoscopy with concurrent IV sedation. Analysis Independent t-test and Chi-square were used to compare sample characteristics. Number of gags, ease of intubation and &quot;faces&quot; scores were compared between groups using the Mann-Whitney U test. The children's perception of their experience was examined using the Wong-Baker Faces visual analogue scale and a take home questionnaire analyzed by using a chi-square test. Findings: There was no significant difference in the efficacy of using topical pharyngeal anesthesia between the two groups, as measured by the number of gags (p=.390) and ease of endoscopic intubation (p=.877). Topical pharyngeal spray was perceived as unpleasant, with no significant difference between the two groups (p=.715). Recommendations for improving patient care during UGI endoscopy are made applying the Walsh conceptual model of intervention.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:14:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:14:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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