2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159689
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women’s decision making regarding disclosure of HIV seropositivity
Abstract:
Women’s decision making regarding disclosure of HIV seropositivity
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Walsh, Elissa
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Contact Telephone:734.647.0343
The purpose of this qualitative research was to describe the decision experiences of HIV seropositive women regarding their disclosure of seropositivity to others in their social milieu. Decision theory informed the research; testing of specific theory was not appropriate for this investigation. Audiotaped semi-structured interviews of twenty seven women at three agencies were evaluated using grounded theory techniques (Corbin & Strauss, 1990). Six factors affected the willingness to disclose seropositivity. They were: 1) motivation/imperative, 2)connection, 3)trust, 4)HIV knowledge and attitude, 5)self knowledge and attitude, and 6)perception of self as an HIV positive person (felt stigma). These factors were expressed in three distinct disclosure styles: 1)selective, 2)closed, and 3)open. Most of the subjects selectively disclosed their seropositivity to a very limited number of individuals. Others were either very secretive about their serostatus, telling almost no one and angrily denying their status when questioned, or generally open and willing to tell their story, usually as a cautionary tale. Though openness about HIV seropositivity was initially be seen as most desirable, the extreme stigma associated with the disease supports selective disclosure as generally preferable.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen’s decision making regarding disclosure of HIV seropositivityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159689-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Women&rsquo;s decision making regarding disclosure of HIV seropositivity</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Walsh, Elissa</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734.647.0343</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ercwalsh@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this qualitative research was to describe the decision experiences of HIV seropositive women regarding their disclosure of seropositivity to others in their social milieu. Decision theory informed the research; testing of specific theory was not appropriate for this investigation. Audiotaped semi-structured interviews of twenty seven women at three agencies were evaluated using grounded theory techniques (Corbin &amp; Strauss, 1990). Six factors affected the willingness to disclose seropositivity. They were: 1) motivation/imperative, 2)connection, 3)trust, 4)HIV knowledge and attitude, 5)self knowledge and attitude, and 6)perception of self as an HIV positive person (felt stigma). These factors were expressed in three distinct disclosure styles: 1)selective, 2)closed, and 3)open. Most of the subjects selectively disclosed their seropositivity to a very limited number of individuals. Others were either very secretive about their serostatus, telling almost no one and angrily denying their status when questioned, or generally open and willing to tell their story, usually as a cautionary tale. Though openness about HIV seropositivity was initially be seen as most desirable, the extreme stigma associated with the disease supports selective disclosure as generally preferable.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:14:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:14:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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