2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159695
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Japanese couples’ childbirth experience in Michigan: Implications for care
Abstract:
Japanese couples’ childbirth experience in Michigan: Implications for care
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Yeo, SeonAe
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Contact Telephone:734.763.3413
Background: Subtle cultural differences in the childbirth experience for expatriate Japanese couples in southeast Michigan sometimes cause overt and covert conflicts between American health care providers and Japanese couples. The purpose of the study was to elucidate Japanese couples' perception and experience of prenatal care and associated childbirth experiences in Michigan and to explore the implications for providing culturally competent care. Medthods: Qualitative study method was applied with in-depth interviews and a short questionnaire. The study was conducted in a university-affiliated outpatient clinic during the period of November 1997 to July 1998. Japanese couples, defined as having at least one of a couple who was Japanese born and spoke Japanese as a first language, that were patients in the above clinic or attending Japanese prenatal classes were eligible. Eleven couples (n=22) participated. Results: Six phenomena were emerged: language barrier, ultrasonography, prenatal vitamine supplement, episiotomy, epidural anesthesia, and provider-patient relationship. Another thread of emerging phenomenon through these six areas was that health care professionals in their home country had harder time to accept health care. Conclusion: Providing culturally competent care requires in-depth understanding of provider-receiver relationships.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleJapanese couples’ childbirth experience in Michigan: Implications for careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159695-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Japanese couples&rsquo; childbirth experience in Michigan: Implications for care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Yeo, SeonAe</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734.763.3413</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">seonaeyo@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Subtle cultural differences in the childbirth experience for expatriate Japanese couples in southeast Michigan sometimes cause overt and covert conflicts between American health care providers and Japanese couples. The purpose of the study was to elucidate Japanese couples' perception and experience of prenatal care and associated childbirth experiences in Michigan and to explore the implications for providing culturally competent care. Medthods: Qualitative study method was applied with in-depth interviews and a short questionnaire. The study was conducted in a university-affiliated outpatient clinic during the period of November 1997 to July 1998. Japanese couples, defined as having at least one of a couple who was Japanese born and spoke Japanese as a first language, that were patients in the above clinic or attending Japanese prenatal classes were eligible. Eleven couples (n=22) participated. Results: Six phenomena were emerged: language barrier, ultrasonography, prenatal vitamine supplement, episiotomy, epidural anesthesia, and provider-patient relationship. Another thread of emerging phenomenon through these six areas was that health care professionals in their home country had harder time to accept health care. Conclusion: Providing culturally competent care requires in-depth understanding of provider-receiver relationships.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:14:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:14:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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