2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159701
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self-Care of Women with Osteoarthritis Living at Different Levels of Independence
Abstract:
Self-Care of Women with Osteoarthritis Living at Different Levels of Independence
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Baird, Carol, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:Purdue University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1337 Johnson Hall, West Lafayette, IN, 47907-1337, USA
Contact Telephone:765.494.4036
The purpose of the research was to examine the experiences of self-caring of older women with osteoarthritis (OA) living in various levels of independence. Because the questions involved lived experiences, naturalistic inquiry structured data collection and no a priori theory was used. Interviews were conducted with 60 women over 65-years-old (m=82 yrs), 19 living in houses in the community, 16 living in assisted-living apartments, and 25 living in nursing homes. This report concerns the descriptions of self-care. Analyses of relationships and differences indicated many significant results. Age and housing were correlated, with the more elderly women living in less independent environments. Being older was related to using a walker and visiting with people. Younger age was related to taking arthritis medicine, having surgery, using acupuncture, and resting. Community-residing women reported more difficulty with fatigue and in sleeping, sitting too long, bed-making, and home maintenance. Community-residing women were more likely to diet, rely on others, and use natural remedies. Community-residing women were more likely to cope by using spirituality, humor, and comparing themselves favorably with others. The community-residing women expressed interest in learning. Assisted-living women were more likely to use canes, walk for exercise, take analgesics, and practice a healthy lifestyle. Assisted-living women were more likely to use determination and to refuse to do what they could not do. Nursing home women were more likely to use walkers and wheelchairs. Living in more independent environments was related to being depressed. Living in less independent environments was related to increased fear of falling. Results of the study may be useful in planning self-care for OA with women living in a variety of environments. Results were used to develop an instrument, the Measurement of Osteoarthritis Self-Care (MOSC), to be used by health care providers in assessing the self-care of adults with OA.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf-Care of Women with Osteoarthritis Living at Different Levels of Independenceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159701-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Self-Care of Women with Osteoarthritis Living at Different Levels of Independence</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Baird, Carol, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Purdue University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1337 Johnson Hall, West Lafayette, IN, 47907-1337, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">765.494.4036</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bairdcl@purdue.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of the research was to examine the experiences of self-caring of older women with osteoarthritis (OA) living in various levels of independence. Because the questions involved lived experiences, naturalistic inquiry structured data collection and no a priori theory was used. Interviews were conducted with 60 women over 65-years-old (m=82 yrs), 19 living in houses in the community, 16 living in assisted-living apartments, and 25 living in nursing homes. This report concerns the descriptions of self-care. Analyses of relationships and differences indicated many significant results. Age and housing were correlated, with the more elderly women living in less independent environments. Being older was related to using a walker and visiting with people. Younger age was related to taking arthritis medicine, having surgery, using acupuncture, and resting. Community-residing women reported more difficulty with fatigue and in sleeping, sitting too long, bed-making, and home maintenance. Community-residing women were more likely to diet, rely on others, and use natural remedies. Community-residing women were more likely to cope by using spirituality, humor, and comparing themselves favorably with others. The community-residing women expressed interest in learning. Assisted-living women were more likely to use canes, walk for exercise, take analgesics, and practice a healthy lifestyle. Assisted-living women were more likely to use determination and to refuse to do what they could not do. Nursing home women were more likely to use walkers and wheelchairs. Living in more independent environments was related to being depressed. Living in less independent environments was related to increased fear of falling. Results of the study may be useful in planning self-care for OA with women living in a variety of environments. Results were used to develop an instrument, the Measurement of Osteoarthritis Self-Care (MOSC), to be used by health care providers in assessing the self-care of adults with OA.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:15:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:15:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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