2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159704
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Influence of the Bystander during Acute Myocardial Infarction
Abstract:
The Influence of the Bystander during Acute Myocardial Infarction
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Zerwic, Julie
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, 744 NURS, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312.996.8431
In order to access the health care system during an acute myocardial infarction (AMI), an individual must be able to identify their symptoms as serious and make the decision to seek treatment. Although the health care provider's goal is to treat patients within the first hour after the onset of symptoms, most individuals delay for 2-4 hours or longer. Many patients are with other individuals (bystanders) at the time of symptoms; however, very little is known about the role bystanders play in this process. The purpose of this study was to examine factors that contributed to health care seeking behaviors among a diverse group of men and women who were hospitalized with. Patients were interviewed shortly after admission for (n=220) about their experience during. Eighty-nine percent of patients (n=196) had a bystander present during part or all of the symptom experience. A few bystanders were not aware the patient was having symptoms (n=7) or were only involved in transporting the subject to the hospital (n=23). The largest group of bystanders were spouses (41%) followed by children (23%) and coworkers (11%). If patients consented and the bystander was 18 years of age, their bystander was contacted and invited to participate in the study. Bystanders were then interviewed about their perceptions of the experience and their knowledge ofI symptoms (n=74). The majority of bystanders (56%) stated that the patients' symptoms were not what they expected during and an additional 11% were unsure. Data revealed that bystanders are expecting individuals experiencing any to have a severe and dramatic event. These expectations my hinder the bystander's ability to help patients seek timely treatment during.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Influence of the Bystander during Acute Myocardial Infarctionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159704-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Influence of the Bystander during Acute Myocardial Infarction</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zerwic, Julie</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, 744 NURS, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312.996.8431</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">juljohns@uic.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In order to access the health care system during an acute myocardial infarction (AMI), an individual must be able to identify their symptoms as serious and make the decision to seek treatment. Although the health care provider's goal is to treat patients within the first hour after the onset of symptoms, most individuals delay for 2-4 hours or longer. Many patients are with other individuals (bystanders) at the time of symptoms; however, very little is known about the role bystanders play in this process. The purpose of this study was to examine factors that contributed to health care seeking behaviors among a diverse group of men and women who were hospitalized with. Patients were interviewed shortly after admission for (n=220) about their experience during. Eighty-nine percent of patients (n=196) had a bystander present during part or all of the symptom experience. A few bystanders were not aware the patient was having symptoms (n=7) or were only involved in transporting the subject to the hospital (n=23). The largest group of bystanders were spouses (41%) followed by children (23%) and coworkers (11%). If patients consented and the bystander was 18 years of age, their bystander was contacted and invited to participate in the study. Bystanders were then interviewed about their perceptions of the experience and their knowledge ofI symptoms (n=74). The majority of bystanders (56%) stated that the patients' symptoms were not what they expected during and an additional 11% were unsure. Data revealed that bystanders are expecting individuals experiencing any to have a severe and dramatic event. These expectations my hinder the bystander's ability to help patients seek timely treatment during.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:15:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:15:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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