2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159708
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Parent Training with Parents of Color in Low-Income Urban Communities
Abstract:
Parent Training with Parents of Color in Low-Income Urban Communities
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Gross, Deborah, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:Rush University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 600 South Paulina, Suite 1080, Chicago, IL, 60612-3873, USA
Contact Telephone:312.942.6201
The purpose of this study was to test a 12-week parent training program with an ethnically-diverse sample of parents and teachers of 2-3 year olds in day care centers serving low-income Chicago families. The intervention was based on a social learning model and was tested using a quasi-experimental design. Outcomes of interest were parenting self-efficacy, discipline strategies, child behavior problems, parent stress, and quality of parent-child and teacher-child interactions. Data included using self-report, teacher-report, and observation and were collected four times over 15 months. Eleven centers (n=264 families, 97% minority) were matched and randomly assigned to one of four conditions: (a) parent training offered to parents and teachers (P+T), (b) parent training for parents only (PT), (c) parent training for teachers who would then teach the parents (TT), and (d) a waiting-list control (C). Data were analyzed using growth curve modeling and chi-square analyses. After controlling for stress, PT and P+T parents had higher self-efficacy and used more positive behaviors and less coercive discipline strategies with their children than C and TT parents. TT and P+T teachers used more positive behaviors in the classroom than controls. Children in the PT, P+T, and TT conditions who had high rates of classroom behavior problems showed greater behavioral improvements than controls. Most experimental effects were retained one year post-intervention however benefits were greatest when parents directly received intervention (PT and P+T). Discussion will focus on (a) implications of parent training in day care centers serving low-income families and toddlers of color and (b)the relative cost-effectiveness of delivering the intervention to parents versus day care teachers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParent Training with Parents of Color in Low-Income Urban Communitiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159708-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Parent Training with Parents of Color in Low-Income Urban Communities</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gross, Deborah, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Rush University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 600 South Paulina, Suite 1080, Chicago, IL, 60612-3873, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312.942.6201</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to test a 12-week parent training program with an ethnically-diverse sample of parents and teachers of 2-3 year olds in day care centers serving low-income Chicago families. The intervention was based on a social learning model and was tested using a quasi-experimental design. Outcomes of interest were parenting self-efficacy, discipline strategies, child behavior problems, parent stress, and quality of parent-child and teacher-child interactions. Data included using self-report, teacher-report, and observation and were collected four times over 15 months. Eleven centers (n=264 families, 97% minority) were matched and randomly assigned to one of four conditions: (a) parent training offered to parents and teachers (P+T), (b) parent training for parents only (PT), (c) parent training for teachers who would then teach the parents (TT), and (d) a waiting-list control (C). Data were analyzed using growth curve modeling and chi-square analyses. After controlling for stress, PT and P+T parents had higher self-efficacy and used more positive behaviors and less coercive discipline strategies with their children than C and TT parents. TT and P+T teachers used more positive behaviors in the classroom than controls. Children in the PT, P+T, and TT conditions who had high rates of classroom behavior problems showed greater behavioral improvements than controls. Most experimental effects were retained one year post-intervention however benefits were greatest when parents directly received intervention (PT and P+T). Discussion will focus on (a) implications of parent training in day care centers serving low-income families and toddlers of color and (b)the relative cost-effectiveness of delivering the intervention to parents versus day care teachers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:15:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:15:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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