Perinatal Loss in Low-Income, African American Parents: Dealing with Loss and Life Stressors

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159709
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perinatal Loss in Low-Income, African American Parents: Dealing with Loss and Life Stressors
Abstract:
Perinatal Loss in Low-Income, African American Parents: Dealing with Loss and Life Stressors
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Kavanaugh, Karen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, 848 NURS, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312.996.6828
Low-income, African American families often experience stressful life situations. Additionally, the incidence of perinatal loss is twice as high in Blacks in comparison to Whites. Yet, no investigators have focused on perinatal loss in these families. The purpose of this project was to examine parents' descriptions of their life stressors surrounding perinatal loss. For this project, data were examined from a phenomenological study on perinatal loss in low-income, African American parents. For the phenomenological study, a total of 35 interviews were held between one and four months after the loss with 14 mothers and 4 fathers who had experienced a perinatal loss due to pregnancy loss (16 weeks of gestation or later) or a neonatal death. Data analysis consisted of: (a) reading all interview transcripts, (b) identifying all statements in the transcripts that pertain to life stressors, (c) coding the significant statements into categories, (d) integrating the results into a description of each category, and (e) validating the findings with the parents. The results of this project reveal that during the pregnancy, the parents typically were dealing with other stressful life situations. Many parents had lost close family members, such as their mother or grandmother who had raised them, in the months preceding the baby's death. A number of parents had also experienced the homicidal death of a close friend or family member. Many mothers were subjected to stress, such as multiple relocations due to neighborhood crime, that they felt had an impact on their pregnancy. Parents described ways of coping, which included a strong emphasis on spirituality. These findings have implications for health care professionals who care for parents who are struggling with many life stressors in addition to a loss.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerinatal Loss in Low-Income, African American Parents: Dealing with Loss and Life Stressorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159709-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perinatal Loss in Low-Income, African American Parents: Dealing with Loss and Life Stressors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kavanaugh, Karen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, 848 NURS, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312.996.6828</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">karenk@uic.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Low-income, African American families often experience stressful life situations. Additionally, the incidence of perinatal loss is twice as high in Blacks in comparison to Whites. Yet, no investigators have focused on perinatal loss in these families. The purpose of this project was to examine parents' descriptions of their life stressors surrounding perinatal loss. For this project, data were examined from a phenomenological study on perinatal loss in low-income, African American parents. For the phenomenological study, a total of 35 interviews were held between one and four months after the loss with 14 mothers and 4 fathers who had experienced a perinatal loss due to pregnancy loss (16 weeks of gestation or later) or a neonatal death. Data analysis consisted of: (a) reading all interview transcripts, (b) identifying all statements in the transcripts that pertain to life stressors, (c) coding the significant statements into categories, (d) integrating the results into a description of each category, and (e) validating the findings with the parents. The results of this project reveal that during the pregnancy, the parents typically were dealing with other stressful life situations. Many parents had lost close family members, such as their mother or grandmother who had raised them, in the months preceding the baby's death. A number of parents had also experienced the homicidal death of a close friend or family member. Many mothers were subjected to stress, such as multiple relocations due to neighborhood crime, that they felt had an impact on their pregnancy. Parents described ways of coping, which included a strong emphasis on spirituality. These findings have implications for health care professionals who care for parents who are struggling with many life stressors in addition to a loss.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:15:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:15:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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