2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159710
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Domestic Violence Education and Support Program
Abstract:
Domestic Violence Education and Support Program
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Glazer, Greer, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Kent State University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, PO Box 5190, Kent, OH, 44242-0001, USA
Contact Telephone:330.672.7930
Domestic violence is a major health problem of epidemic proportions in the United States and worldwide. Approximately 25% of American women will be abused by a current or former partner during their lifetime. Pregnancy is a period of increased risk for domestic violence with prevalence rates ranging from 0.9% - 20.1%. Although the Surgeon General recommended that assessment for violence during pregnancy become a routine part of prenatal care in 1985, this has not come close to reality in 2001. One potential significant barrier to identification of domestic violence is the nurse's personal experience with domestic violence. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a continuing education program for women's health nurses including 4 1/2 hours of content on domestic violence: a primary health issue, cultural competency and strategies for screening assessment, intervention and health records documentation; a resource manual; and optional 1 1/2 hour discussion session led by a RN, PhD prepared counseling psychologist for nurses who have experienced domestic violence. Nurses from 14 Ohio hospitals with obstetric units in eight small counties and 12 women's health nurse practitioner students were invited to attend the free workshop. Twenty-nine nurses attended the workshop. There was a significant increase in knowledge about domestic violence (t=3.601, p=.001) and more positive attitudes (t=-8.384, p=.000) from before the workshop to immediately after the workshop. Practice skills changed one month following the program. Nurses who attended the optional discussion session found it helpful. A domestic violence education and support program can make a difference in the delivery of health care to women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDomestic Violence Education and Support Programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159710-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Domestic Violence Education and Support Program</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Glazer, Greer, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kent State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, PO Box 5190, Kent, OH, 44242-0001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330.672.7930</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gglazer@kent.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Domestic violence is a major health problem of epidemic proportions in the United States and worldwide. Approximately 25% of American women will be abused by a current or former partner during their lifetime. Pregnancy is a period of increased risk for domestic violence with prevalence rates ranging from 0.9% - 20.1%. Although the Surgeon General recommended that assessment for violence during pregnancy become a routine part of prenatal care in 1985, this has not come close to reality in 2001. One potential significant barrier to identification of domestic violence is the nurse's personal experience with domestic violence. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a continuing education program for women's health nurses including 4 1/2 hours of content on domestic violence: a primary health issue, cultural competency and strategies for screening assessment, intervention and health records documentation; a resource manual; and optional 1 1/2 hour discussion session led by a RN, PhD prepared counseling psychologist for nurses who have experienced domestic violence. Nurses from 14 Ohio hospitals with obstetric units in eight small counties and 12 women's health nurse practitioner students were invited to attend the free workshop. Twenty-nine nurses attended the workshop. There was a significant increase in knowledge about domestic violence (t=3.601, p=.001) and more positive attitudes (t=-8.384, p=.000) from before the workshop to immediately after the workshop. Practice skills changed one month following the program. Nurses who attended the optional discussion session found it helpful. A domestic violence education and support program can make a difference in the delivery of health care to women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:15:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:15:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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