2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159711
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Positive Self-Transitions of Women Child Abuse Survivors
Abstract:
Positive Self-Transitions of Women Child Abuse Survivors
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Hall, Joanne, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Tennessee
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1200 Volunteer Boulevard, Room 335, Knoxville, TN, 37996-4180, USA
Contact Telephone:865.974.5769
The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore thriving in women survivors of childhood abuse. The study is based on critical and feminist theories, especially as expressed in the concept of marginalization. Abuse, gender, race/ethnicity and psychiatric symptoms are marginalizing factors that are often interrelated. The sample included 23 low-income, women child abuse survivors. All experienced multiple forms of abuse/neglect that occurred before age 18. Ethnic/racial distribution was: African-American 15, Euroamerican 5, Native American 2, and Latina 1. Ages ranged from 23-50, mean=37. The participants responded to flyers, and service providers in outpatient substance abuse aftercare facilities referred several others. Nearly all the participants were in their first 2 years of recovery from substance misuse (most commonly cocaine use). None were actively using drugs for the prior 6 months. Each woman completed a 2-hour open-ended interview with the primary investigator to tell her story about surviving abuse and aftereffects. The audio taped interviews were transcribed and examined for problems related to survival using narrative analysis by the primary investigator. Subsequently in the analysis the primary investigator and 9 graduate students identified specific aspects of thriving/positivity in individual participants' accounts. Collectively the narrative themes were compared in the larger context of cultural and political resources and constraints to thriving. The initial finding was that there were crucial turning points in the narratives indicating positive changes for many thriving participants. Components of positive self-transitions were noted: self-trust, epiphanies, ownership, momentum, willfulness, recovery(ies), insulation, and connecting with nature/spirit. In conclusion, the fact that some participants and not others exhibited positive transitions deserves further study. Because nearly all of the participants were substance abusers, they represent only a subgroup of survivors. Moreover, components of transitions could not be "prioritized" on the basis of these narratives.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePositive Self-Transitions of Women Child Abuse Survivorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159711-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Positive Self-Transitions of Women Child Abuse Survivors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hall, Joanne, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Tennessee</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1200 Volunteer Boulevard, Room 335, Knoxville, TN, 37996-4180, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">865.974.5769</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jhall7@utk.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore thriving in women survivors of childhood abuse. The study is based on critical and feminist theories, especially as expressed in the concept of marginalization. Abuse, gender, race/ethnicity and psychiatric symptoms are marginalizing factors that are often interrelated. The sample included 23 low-income, women child abuse survivors. All experienced multiple forms of abuse/neglect that occurred before age 18. Ethnic/racial distribution was: African-American 15, Euroamerican 5, Native American 2, and Latina 1. Ages ranged from 23-50, mean=37. The participants responded to flyers, and service providers in outpatient substance abuse aftercare facilities referred several others. Nearly all the participants were in their first 2 years of recovery from substance misuse (most commonly cocaine use). None were actively using drugs for the prior 6 months. Each woman completed a 2-hour open-ended interview with the primary investigator to tell her story about surviving abuse and aftereffects. The audio taped interviews were transcribed and examined for problems related to survival using narrative analysis by the primary investigator. Subsequently in the analysis the primary investigator and 9 graduate students identified specific aspects of thriving/positivity in individual participants' accounts. Collectively the narrative themes were compared in the larger context of cultural and political resources and constraints to thriving. The initial finding was that there were crucial turning points in the narratives indicating positive changes for many thriving participants. Components of positive self-transitions were noted: self-trust, epiphanies, ownership, momentum, willfulness, recovery(ies), insulation, and connecting with nature/spirit. In conclusion, the fact that some participants and not others exhibited positive transitions deserves further study. Because nearly all of the participants were substance abusers, they represent only a subgroup of survivors. Moreover, components of transitions could not be &quot;prioritized&quot; on the basis of these narratives.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:15:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:15:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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