2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159712
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Efficacy of Dye-Stained Enteral Formula in Detecting Pulmonary Aspiration
Abstract:
Efficacy of Dye-Stained Enteral Formula in Detecting Pulmonary Aspiration
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Metheny, Norma, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Louis University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3525 Caroline Street, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA
Contact Telephone:314.577.8941
Observing for the appearance of dye-stained enteral formula in suctioned tracheal secretions is commonly used to detect aspiration in tube-fed patients. Despite its widespread use, however, no research-based data exist to support the efficacy of the dye method. This study was designed to determine the extent to which a mixture of human gastric juice and enteral formula stained with two concentrations of blue dye (0.8 ml/L and 1.5 ml/L) is visible in suctioned tracheal secretions following forced pulmonary aspiration. A total of 270 tracheal secretions were collected from 90 New Zealand white rabbits that were anesthetized, intubated, and mechanically ventilated. The experimental procedure consisted of instilling 0.4 ml/kg of the mixture intra-tracheally over a 30-minute period and then waiting 90 minutes before endotracheal suctioning was performed. The suctioned material was visually inspected against a white background for the presence of dye. This process was repeated twice during the 6-hour experiment. Overall, dye was visible in 46.3% (125/270) of the suctioned secretions. Blood in 114 of the secretions precluded dye visibility in all but 2 cases; when blood was absent, dye was visible in 77% (59/77) of the secretions from the low dye group and in 81% (64/79) of those from the higher dye group. Regardless of the dye concentration, dye visibility deteriorated over time to 60% of the blood-free secretions at the end of the experiment. It is concluded that the dye method is unreliable when blood is present and that decreased dye visibility over time limits the usefulness of this method.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEfficacy of Dye-Stained Enteral Formula in Detecting Pulmonary Aspirationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159712-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Efficacy of Dye-Stained Enteral Formula in Detecting Pulmonary Aspiration</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Metheny, Norma, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Louis University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3525 Caroline Street, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">314.577.8941</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">methenna@slu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Observing for the appearance of dye-stained enteral formula in suctioned tracheal secretions is commonly used to detect aspiration in tube-fed patients. Despite its widespread use, however, no research-based data exist to support the efficacy of the dye method. This study was designed to determine the extent to which a mixture of human gastric juice and enteral formula stained with two concentrations of blue dye (0.8 ml/L and 1.5 ml/L) is visible in suctioned tracheal secretions following forced pulmonary aspiration. A total of 270 tracheal secretions were collected from 90 New Zealand white rabbits that were anesthetized, intubated, and mechanically ventilated. The experimental procedure consisted of instilling 0.4 ml/kg of the mixture intra-tracheally over a 30-minute period and then waiting 90 minutes before endotracheal suctioning was performed. The suctioned material was visually inspected against a white background for the presence of dye. This process was repeated twice during the 6-hour experiment. Overall, dye was visible in 46.3% (125/270) of the suctioned secretions. Blood in 114 of the secretions precluded dye visibility in all but 2 cases; when blood was absent, dye was visible in 77% (59/77) of the secretions from the low dye group and in 81% (64/79) of those from the higher dye group. Regardless of the dye concentration, dye visibility deteriorated over time to 60% of the blood-free secretions at the end of the experiment. It is concluded that the dye method is unreliable when blood is present and that decreased dye visibility over time limits the usefulness of this method.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:15:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:15:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.