2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159713
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Change after Skin Cancer Screening and Education
Abstract:
Change after Skin Cancer Screening and Education
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Huckstadt, Alicia, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Wichita State University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 500 Ahlberg Hall, PO Box 41, 1845 Fairmount, Wichita, KS, 67260-0041, USA
Contact Telephone:316.978.5742
The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of adults toward sun exposure/skin care and to examine the effect of a specially designed skin cancer screening/education project on sun exposure attitudes, knowledge, and behavior. A Stages of Change framework was used for the study. Subjects included 120 adults attending screening clinics located in a large Midwestern city. After signed consent, subjects who agreed to participate in the study were requested to complete the demographic data form and the Sun & Skin Inventory prior to their skin cancer screening. The skin cancer screening was performed by a clinic dermatologist and nurse practitioners who provided specifically designed patient education and resources to the participants. Approximately four months after the screening, participants were mailed a follow-up survey to identify changes in sun exposure knowledge, attitudes and behaviors. Analysis of selected demographic variables revealed the mean age of participants was 43.15 and the majority were female, Caucasian, believed they looked better with a suntan, and thought suntans looked healthy. Approximately 1/3 had used a tanning salon and 1/3 had a family history of skin cancer. Results indicated participants' attitudes toward the positive appearance of suntans did not change upon follow-up; however, participants used more sun screens, decreased their use of tanning parlors, increased their awareness of the dangers of sun exposure, and shared information they learned from the project with family and friends. Attitudes toward attractiveness of tanned skin did not change in this study; however positive behaviors to protect the subjects' skin did increase. Screening and education programs should be combined to identify existing and potential skin cancer and promote behaviors to best protect the skin. The Stages of Change framework can be useful in identifying interventions tailored for individuals.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChange after Skin Cancer Screening and Educationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159713-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Change after Skin Cancer Screening and Education</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Huckstadt, Alicia, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wichita State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 500 Ahlberg Hall, PO Box 41, 1845 Fairmount, Wichita, KS, 67260-0041, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">316.978.5742</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">alicia.huckstadt@wichita.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of adults toward sun exposure/skin care and to examine the effect of a specially designed skin cancer screening/education project on sun exposure attitudes, knowledge, and behavior. A Stages of Change framework was used for the study. Subjects included 120 adults attending screening clinics located in a large Midwestern city. After signed consent, subjects who agreed to participate in the study were requested to complete the demographic data form and the Sun &amp; Skin Inventory prior to their skin cancer screening. The skin cancer screening was performed by a clinic dermatologist and nurse practitioners who provided specifically designed patient education and resources to the participants. Approximately four months after the screening, participants were mailed a follow-up survey to identify changes in sun exposure knowledge, attitudes and behaviors. Analysis of selected demographic variables revealed the mean age of participants was 43.15 and the majority were female, Caucasian, believed they looked better with a suntan, and thought suntans looked healthy. Approximately 1/3 had used a tanning salon and 1/3 had a family history of skin cancer. Results indicated participants' attitudes toward the positive appearance of suntans did not change upon follow-up; however, participants used more sun screens, decreased their use of tanning parlors, increased their awareness of the dangers of sun exposure, and shared information they learned from the project with family and friends. Attitudes toward attractiveness of tanned skin did not change in this study; however positive behaviors to protect the subjects' skin did increase. Screening and education programs should be combined to identify existing and potential skin cancer and promote behaviors to best protect the skin. The Stages of Change framework can be useful in identifying interventions tailored for individuals.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:15:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:15:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.