2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159714
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of Boosters of Interventions
Abstract:
Effects of Boosters of Interventions
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Lusk, Sally, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls Building, 3182 SNB, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Contact Telephone:734.647.0347
There is a perception that boosters of interventions are important to promote continuation of desired behaviors. However, there is little in the literature to validate this perception. In this study, factory workers were randomly assigned to one of three computer-based interventions (tailored, predictor-based, or control) designed to increase use of hearing protection (HP). Subjects (n=1290) were predominately male (86.2%), middle-aged (mean=44.6, s.d.=9.3), and Caucasian (74%). The study was designed to test the effect of the interventions and to test the number and timing of boosters, which were specific to the type of intervention received. Following the intervention, boosters were mailed to workers' homes. Workers were randomly assigned to one of four booster treatment groups: 1 at 3 months, 1 at 6 months, 1 at 3 and 6 months, and no boosters. At the posttest, approximately one year later, the tailored intervention showed a significant increase in use of HP. However, none of the three booster conditions contributed to a significant increase in the use of HP over the no booster condition. Further studies of frequency and timing of boosters are needed to determine the most effective means of using this tool to promote various types of behavior change.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of Boosters of Interventionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159714-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of Boosters of Interventions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lusk, Sally, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls Building, 3182 SNB, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734.647.0347</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lusk@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">There is a perception that boosters of interventions are important to promote continuation of desired behaviors. However, there is little in the literature to validate this perception. In this study, factory workers were randomly assigned to one of three computer-based interventions (tailored, predictor-based, or control) designed to increase use of hearing protection (HP). Subjects (n=1290) were predominately male (86.2%), middle-aged (mean=44.6, s.d.=9.3), and Caucasian (74%). The study was designed to test the effect of the interventions and to test the number and timing of boosters, which were specific to the type of intervention received. Following the intervention, boosters were mailed to workers' homes. Workers were randomly assigned to one of four booster treatment groups: 1 at 3 months, 1 at 6 months, 1 at 3 and 6 months, and no boosters. At the posttest, approximately one year later, the tailored intervention showed a significant increase in use of HP. However, none of the three booster conditions contributed to a significant increase in the use of HP over the no booster condition. Further studies of frequency and timing of boosters are needed to determine the most effective means of using this tool to promote various types of behavior change.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:16:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:16:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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