2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159721
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Family Experience of Genetic Testing: Ethical Dimensions
Abstract:
The Family Experience of Genetic Testing: Ethical Dimensions
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:VanRiper, Marcia, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:The Ohio State University
Contact Address:1800 Cannon Drive, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA
Contact Telephone:6142920191
Genetic testing is inherently a family issue, therefore the increased availability of genetic testing has pervasive and complex implications for families. Unfortunately, much of the existing research concerning the experience of genetic testing has not been conducted from a family perspective. Because of this, our current understanding of the family experience of genetic testing is very limited. The purpose of this presentation is to share preliminary findings from an ongoing study concerning how families define and manage the ethical issues that emerge during four different types of genetic testing (e.g., triple marker screening for Down syndrome, carrier screening for cystic fibrosis, BRCA1 testing for families at high risk for breast cancer, and mutation analysis for Huntington disease). The four types of genetic testing were chosen because they differ on one or more aspects (e.g., who is tested, when in the life-span testing occurs, and potential impact on childbearing decisions) that may affect the nature and significance of the ethical issues. This study is a collaborative endeavor involving individuals from three disciplines: nursing, genetics, and bioethics. A mixed-method approach is being used. The guiding framework for the study is the Family Management Style Model. Preliminary findings underscore the need to use a family perspective when exploring the genetic testing experience. Identification of the particular ethical dilemmas that arise in the context of the family is necessary for the development of nursing interventions that support the family experience.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Family Experience of Genetic Testing: Ethical Dimensionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159721-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Family Experience of Genetic Testing: Ethical Dimensions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">VanRiper, Marcia, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The Ohio State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1800 Cannon Drive, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">6142920191</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">van-riper.1@osu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Genetic testing is inherently a family issue, therefore the increased availability of genetic testing has pervasive and complex implications for families. Unfortunately, much of the existing research concerning the experience of genetic testing has not been conducted from a family perspective. Because of this, our current understanding of the family experience of genetic testing is very limited. The purpose of this presentation is to share preliminary findings from an ongoing study concerning how families define and manage the ethical issues that emerge during four different types of genetic testing (e.g., triple marker screening for Down syndrome, carrier screening for cystic fibrosis, BRCA1 testing for families at high risk for breast cancer, and mutation analysis for Huntington disease). The four types of genetic testing were chosen because they differ on one or more aspects (e.g., who is tested, when in the life-span testing occurs, and potential impact on childbearing decisions) that may affect the nature and significance of the ethical issues. This study is a collaborative endeavor involving individuals from three disciplines: nursing, genetics, and bioethics. A mixed-method approach is being used. The guiding framework for the study is the Family Management Style Model. Preliminary findings underscore the need to use a family perspective when exploring the genetic testing experience. Identification of the particular ethical dilemmas that arise in the context of the family is necessary for the development of nursing interventions that support the family experience.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:16:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:16:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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