2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159723
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Roy's Adaptation Model and Hospice Family Coping Efficacy
Abstract:
Roy's Adaptation Model and Hospice Family Coping Efficacy
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Robinson, Janet
P.I. Institution Name:Medical College of Ohio
Title:Associate Dean
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3000 Arlington Avenue, Toledo, OH, 43614, USA
Empirical knowledge about how well families cope, the burden they endure, their spiritual well being and support systems is significant to hospice nursing practice. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the relationships among hospice family coping efficacy, social support, hospice staff support, spiritual well-being and caregiver burden. The study was conceptualized within Roy's adaptation model. The focal stimulus was the terminal illness of the significant other. The contextual stimuli were: social support, hospice staff support, caregiver burden and spiritual well-being. Residual stimuli were all the unknown influences in the environment. The study examined how the stimuli affected coping efficacy. Instruments included: Norbeck's Social Support questionnaire, a revised NSSQ assessing hospice staff support, the Caregiver Strain Index, Spiritual Well-Being Scale, and the Jalowiec Coping Scale. The study used an ex-post facto correlational longitudinal research design. Data were collected from a convenience sample of 34 primary caregivers at the time of admission to hospice and 4-6 weeks post-bereavement. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, paired t tests, and Pearson's product Moment correlation. The mean age of the caregivers was 60, SD 11.70 (range 43-79). There were seven males and 27 females. Cronbach alphas for the Revised Jalowiec Coping Scale, the Caregiver Strain Index and the Spiritual Well-Being Scale were all above .80. There was a significant relationship between spiritual well-being and coping efficacy (r=-.37, p=.03) that was not supported by the theoretical framework.. This pilot research suggested that conceptualizations made and methodology used were useful ways to study the phenomena and that further research is warranted.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRoy's Adaptation Model and Hospice Family Coping Efficacyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159723-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Roy's Adaptation Model and Hospice Family Coping Efficacy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Robinson, Janet</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Medical College of Ohio</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3000 Arlington Avenue, Toledo, OH, 43614, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jrobinson@mco.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Empirical knowledge about how well families cope, the burden they endure, their spiritual well being and support systems is significant to hospice nursing practice. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the relationships among hospice family coping efficacy, social support, hospice staff support, spiritual well-being and caregiver burden. The study was conceptualized within Roy's adaptation model. The focal stimulus was the terminal illness of the significant other. The contextual stimuli were: social support, hospice staff support, caregiver burden and spiritual well-being. Residual stimuli were all the unknown influences in the environment. The study examined how the stimuli affected coping efficacy. Instruments included: Norbeck's Social Support questionnaire, a revised NSSQ assessing hospice staff support, the Caregiver Strain Index, Spiritual Well-Being Scale, and the Jalowiec Coping Scale. The study used an ex-post facto correlational longitudinal research design. Data were collected from a convenience sample of 34 primary caregivers at the time of admission to hospice and 4-6 weeks post-bereavement. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, paired t tests, and Pearson's product Moment correlation. The mean age of the caregivers was 60, SD 11.70 (range 43-79). There were seven males and 27 females. Cronbach alphas for the Revised Jalowiec Coping Scale, the Caregiver Strain Index and the Spiritual Well-Being Scale were all above .80. There was a significant relationship between spiritual well-being and coping efficacy (r=-.37, p=.03) that was not supported by the theoretical framework.. This pilot research suggested that conceptualizations made and methodology used were useful ways to study the phenomena and that further research is warranted.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:16:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:16:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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