2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159732
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurse Residency Program: An Exploration of the Evidence
Abstract:
Nurse Residency Program: An Exploration of the Evidence
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Bratt, Marilyn, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Marquette University
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:114 E. Trillium Rd., Mequon, WI, 53092, USA
Contact Telephone:262-853-9529
Co-Authors:M.M. Bratt, T. Schweitzer, Nursing, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI;
Healthcare organizations are challenged to design cost-effective programs that address the alarmingly high rates of new graduate turnover. However, there is lack of evidence regarding the optimal structure and outcomes of programs to bridge the gap between academe and practice and support competency development for newly licensed nurses. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of a 12-month structured regional nurse residency program to enhance new graduates' transition into practice and retention. Benner's Novice to Expert (1985) and Kramer's Reality Shock (1984) theoretical frameworks guided the selection of the learning and psychosocial support strategies for promoting successful student-to-practitioner transition. Subjects were newly licensed nurses employed in 31 urban and rural hospitals who were participating in the structured program (N = 294) between 2005 and 2008. Longitudinal retention and data on perceptions of clinical decision-making (Jenkins, 1985), job satisfaction (Hinshaw & Atwood, 1985), job stress (Hinshaw & Atwood, 1985), organizational commitment (Mowday, Steers & Porter, 1979), and performance of nursing behaviors (Schwirian, 1978) were collected at baseline, 6 and 12 months. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. Results support the tenets of Benner's and Kramer's theories. New graduates enter practice with positive perceptions of their job and organization and an awareness of their need for competency development. Increased job stress and decreased job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and decision-making ability indicated vulnerability to turnover at midpoint and demonstrated persistent learning needs. A rebound effect was noted at endpoint with job stress at the lowest level and job satisfaction at the highest level across all measurements. The findings provide evidence that residency programs need to last a minimum of one year to address the propensity for turnover at approximately 6-9 months after hire and the continuing need for formalized support to develop clinical competency. Participants' organizational retention at two years was 75 - 100%, a significant improvement from pre-implementation and higher than national averages.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurse Residency Program: An Exploration of the Evidenceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159732-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurse Residency Program: An Exploration of the Evidence</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bratt, Marilyn, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Marquette University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">114 E. Trillium Rd., Mequon, WI, 53092, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">262-853-9529</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">marilyn.bratt@marquette.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M.M. Bratt, T. Schweitzer, Nursing, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Healthcare organizations are challenged to design cost-effective programs that address the alarmingly high rates of new graduate turnover. However, there is lack of evidence regarding the optimal structure and outcomes of programs to bridge the gap between academe and practice and support competency development for newly licensed nurses. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of a 12-month structured regional nurse residency program to enhance new graduates' transition into practice and retention. Benner's Novice to Expert (1985) and Kramer's Reality Shock (1984) theoretical frameworks guided the selection of the learning and psychosocial support strategies for promoting successful student-to-practitioner transition. Subjects were newly licensed nurses employed in 31 urban and rural hospitals who were participating in the structured program (N = 294) between 2005 and 2008. Longitudinal retention and data on perceptions of clinical decision-making (Jenkins, 1985), job satisfaction (Hinshaw &amp; Atwood, 1985), job stress (Hinshaw &amp; Atwood, 1985), organizational commitment (Mowday, Steers &amp; Porter, 1979), and performance of nursing behaviors (Schwirian, 1978) were collected at baseline, 6 and 12 months. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. Results support the tenets of Benner's and Kramer's theories. New graduates enter practice with positive perceptions of their job and organization and an awareness of their need for competency development. Increased job stress and decreased job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and decision-making ability indicated vulnerability to turnover at midpoint and demonstrated persistent learning needs. A rebound effect was noted at endpoint with job stress at the lowest level and job satisfaction at the highest level across all measurements. The findings provide evidence that residency programs need to last a minimum of one year to address the propensity for turnover at approximately 6-9 months after hire and the continuing need for formalized support to develop clinical competency. Participants' organizational retention at two years was 75 - 100%, a significant improvement from pre-implementation and higher than national averages.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:16:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:16:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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