Will the Role of 'Subject' Positively Influence Students' Appreciation of Nursing Research?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159733
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Will the Role of 'Subject' Positively Influence Students' Appreciation of Nursing Research?
Abstract:
Will the Role of 'Subject' Positively Influence Students' Appreciation of Nursing Research?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Brough, Elizabeth, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:400 North Ingalls, Room 2348, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA
Contact Telephone:734-647-7326
Co-Authors:E. Brough, R. McCune, O. Daramola, P. Tillman-Meakins, M. Scisney-Matlock, College of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor , MI; B. Archie, School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH;
Faculty members are challenged to improve undergraduate students' appreciation for nursing research despite regular feedback suggesting students have little or no interest. Effective learning experiences must be designed which lead to appreciation for nursing research to ensure the ongoing growth of the profession. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of student participation, as research subjects, in an approved study looking at key parameters thought to be related to increased appreciation for nursing research. Students (n=21) in an undergraduate Honors Nursing Research course consented to test a web-based cognitive-behavioral intervention (CBI) for hypertension patients, developed to enhance adherence to a nationally recommended treatment guideline, Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension eating plan (DASH Diet). A pre/post test design was used to determine changes in mean scores for key parameters: understanding research process, research literature retrieval skills, appreciating barriers to research implementation, fostering patient education, lifestyle dietary intervention adherence, and research team participation. Overall on a scale of 1(lowest) to 4 (highest), student experience response was positive. Internal consistency for both pre and post scales was above 0.80. Results of paired t-test for the six items showed significant differences (p<0.05) and greater post-test means. Greatest mean change score indicated that understanding research would help students foster patient education; lowest score illustrated difficulty in adhering to a lifestyle dietary intervention. Mean difference for total scale scores at pretest versus posttest, was 1.61 vs. 2.94, (t (17) = 9.92, p<0.000). At study end, students' individual written comments suggested improved attitudes towards research and the value of participating in a research study. Active involvement of students in the process of testing and evaluating a patient CBI is effective for increasing students' overall learning experiences, outcomes, and appreciation of nursing research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWill the Role of 'Subject' Positively Influence Students' Appreciation of Nursing Research?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159733-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Will the Role of 'Subject' Positively Influence Students' Appreciation of Nursing Research?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brough, Elizabeth, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">400 North Ingalls, Room 2348, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734-647-7326</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ebrough@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">E. Brough, R. McCune, O. Daramola, P. Tillman-Meakins, M. Scisney-Matlock, College of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor , MI; B. Archie, School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Faculty members are challenged to improve undergraduate students' appreciation for nursing research despite regular feedback suggesting students have little or no interest. Effective learning experiences must be designed which lead to appreciation for nursing research to ensure the ongoing growth of the profession. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of student participation, as research subjects, in an approved study looking at key parameters thought to be related to increased appreciation for nursing research. Students (n=21) in an undergraduate Honors Nursing Research course consented to test a web-based cognitive-behavioral intervention (CBI) for hypertension patients, developed to enhance adherence to a nationally recommended treatment guideline, Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension eating plan (DASH Diet). A pre/post test design was used to determine changes in mean scores for key parameters: understanding research process, research literature retrieval skills, appreciating barriers to research implementation, fostering patient education, lifestyle dietary intervention adherence, and research team participation. Overall on a scale of 1(lowest) to 4 (highest), student experience response was positive. Internal consistency for both pre and post scales was above 0.80. Results of paired t-test for the six items showed significant differences (p&lt;0.05) and greater post-test means. Greatest mean change score indicated that understanding research would help students foster patient education; lowest score illustrated difficulty in adhering to a lifestyle dietary intervention. Mean difference for total scale scores at pretest versus posttest, was 1.61 vs. 2.94, (t (17) = 9.92, p&lt;0.000). At study end, students' individual written comments suggested improved attitudes towards research and the value of participating in a research study. Active involvement of students in the process of testing and evaluating a patient CBI is effective for increasing students' overall learning experiences, outcomes, and appreciation of nursing research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:17:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:17:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.