The Effect of Written Emotional Expression on Promoting Health in Family Caregivers of Persons with Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders: A Randomized Clinical Trial

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159735
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of Written Emotional Expression on Promoting Health in Family Caregivers of Persons with Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders: A Randomized Clinical Trial
Abstract:
The Effect of Written Emotional Expression on Promoting Health in Family Caregivers of Persons with Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders: A Randomized Clinical Trial
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Butcher, Howard, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Title:Adult and Gerontological Nursing Area of Study
Contact Address:442 NB, College of Nursing, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA
Contact Telephone:319-335-7039
Co-Authors:H.K. Butcher, Adult and Gerontological Nursing Area of Study, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; S. Lutgendorf, Department of Psychology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; D. Granger, Department of Biobehavioral Health, Pennsylvania State Univers
Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a writing intervention (structured written emotional expression or SWEE) in decreasing the emotional and physiological burdens in 43 homebound family caregivers (Mean age=66) of persons with Alzheimer disease and related disorders (ADRD) that were randomly assigned to either an experimental or comparison group who wrote for 20 minutes on 3 alternating days. Methods: Experimental group family caregivers (N=25) wrote about their deepest thoughts and feelings about caring for their loved one while those in the comparison group (N=18) wrote about non-emotional topics such as food preparation. Saliva cortisol was measured 4 times a day for two days at pretest, on the 4th and 5th and again at the 30th and 31st days after the last day of writing. A multi level (3 levels) of analyses were performed using HLM software to test the effect of the intervention on saliva cortisol levels and all other dependent measures. Results: The experimental group participants had significantly lower saliva cortisol levels (p=0.011) on the 4th and 5th days after writing but was not significant on the 30th and 31st days after writing. However, when combing the two posttest periods into one, the area under the curve (dinural rhythm) in the experimental group as compared to the comparison group was close to significance (p=.052). Other dependent outcome measures including on finding meaning (Finding Meaning Through Caregiving Scale); caregiver burden (Burden Interview), depression (CES-D), and self reported physical symptoms (Pennebaker Inventory of Limbic Languidness), while not significant showed clear trends in the hypothesized direction. Conclusion: This is the first study to demonstrate that SWEE, a low cost, easy to administer, and innovative intervention significantly reduced saliva cortisol levels in a population of family caregivers. While cortisol levels returned to close to baseline 30 days after the intervention, further research is needed to investigate the effect continuing the 20 minute writing sessions beyond one week and measuring the effect beyond 30 days.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of Written Emotional Expression on Promoting Health in Family Caregivers of Persons with Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders: A Randomized Clinical Trialen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159735-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effect of Written Emotional Expression on Promoting Health in Family Caregivers of Persons with Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders: A Randomized Clinical Trial</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Butcher, Howard, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Adult and Gerontological Nursing Area of Study</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">442 NB, College of Nursing, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">319-335-7039</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">howard-butcher@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">H.K. Butcher, Adult and Gerontological Nursing Area of Study, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; S. Lutgendorf, Department of Psychology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; D. Granger, Department of Biobehavioral Health, Pennsylvania State Univers</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a writing intervention (structured written emotional expression or SWEE) in decreasing the emotional and physiological burdens in 43 homebound family caregivers (Mean age=66) of persons with Alzheimer disease and related disorders (ADRD) that were randomly assigned to either an experimental or comparison group who wrote for 20 minutes on 3 alternating days. Methods: Experimental group family caregivers (N=25) wrote about their deepest thoughts and feelings about caring for their loved one while those in the comparison group (N=18) wrote about non-emotional topics such as food preparation. Saliva cortisol was measured 4 times a day for two days at pretest, on the 4th and 5th and again at the 30th and 31st days after the last day of writing. A multi level (3 levels) of analyses were performed using HLM software to test the effect of the intervention on saliva cortisol levels and all other dependent measures. Results: The experimental group participants had significantly lower saliva cortisol levels (p=0.011) on the 4th and 5th days after writing but was not significant on the 30th and 31st days after writing. However, when combing the two posttest periods into one, the area under the curve (dinural rhythm) in the experimental group as compared to the comparison group was close to significance (p=.052). Other dependent outcome measures including on finding meaning (Finding Meaning Through Caregiving Scale); caregiver burden (Burden Interview), depression (CES-D), and self reported physical symptoms (Pennebaker Inventory of Limbic Languidness), while not significant showed clear trends in the hypothesized direction. Conclusion: This is the first study to demonstrate that SWEE, a low cost, easy to administer, and innovative intervention significantly reduced saliva cortisol levels in a population of family caregivers. While cortisol levels returned to close to baseline 30 days after the intervention, further research is needed to investigate the effect continuing the 20 minute writing sessions beyond one week and measuring the effect beyond 30 days.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:17:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:17:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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