Acculturation, Stress and Stress Buffers Among Pregnant Immigrant Mexican and Mexican American Women.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159737
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Acculturation, Stress and Stress Buffers Among Pregnant Immigrant Mexican and Mexican American Women.
Abstract:
Acculturation, Stress and Stress Buffers Among Pregnant Immigrant Mexican and Mexican American Women.
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Chaponniere, Paulette, PhDc, MPH, BSN, BA
P.I. Institution Name:Hope College
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:35 E. 12th St., Holland, MI, 49423, USA
Contact Telephone:616-395-7426
Co-Authors:P.A. Chaponniere, Nursing Department, Hope College, Holland, MI;
This on-going descriptive prospective study examines how stress affects birth outcomes among pregnant Mexican and Mexican American women. Despite socioeconomic disadvantages, Latina women have similar birth outcomes to Caucasian women. However, immigrant Hispanic women have better birth outcomes than US-born Latinas. This phenomenon has been named the "Latina paradox." Recent findings highlight the impact of psychosocial factors on birth outcomes, in particular stress. Betty Neuman's stress theory model was used as the conceptual framework to examine the association between acculturation, stress, stress buffers (social support, coping and optimism) and birth outcomes (onset of labor and birth weight) among 62 pregnant women living in Western Michigan. Women were recruited through agencies offering maternal health services that included home visits. Data was collected during in-home interviews with subjects using standardized questionnaires in English and Spanish. Birth outcome data was obtained by follow-up phone interview. Interviewers were trained nursing students fluent in Spanish. Data analysis using SPSS has revealed strong correlations. Younger women were more highly acculturated, had higher distress and used avoidance as their main coping style. Women with high anxiety scores were at increased risk for lower birth weight babies and reported more difficulties with pregnancy. Further analysis of which variables have the most impact on birth outcomes is pending. These important findings may be utilized to improve prenatal services offered to Mexican and Mexican American women in the areas of social support and coping. Nurses need to preserve traditional coping styles and encourage social support of women during pregnancy for optimal birth outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAcculturation, Stress and Stress Buffers Among Pregnant Immigrant Mexican and Mexican American Women.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159737-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Acculturation, Stress and Stress Buffers Among Pregnant Immigrant Mexican and Mexican American Women.</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chaponniere, Paulette, PhDc, MPH, BSN, BA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Hope College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">35 E. 12th St., Holland, MI, 49423, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">616-395-7426</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">chaponniere@hope.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">P.A. Chaponniere, Nursing Department, Hope College, Holland, MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This on-going descriptive prospective study examines how stress affects birth outcomes among pregnant Mexican and Mexican American women. Despite socioeconomic disadvantages, Latina women have similar birth outcomes to Caucasian women. However, immigrant Hispanic women have better birth outcomes than US-born Latinas. This phenomenon has been named the &quot;Latina paradox.&quot; Recent findings highlight the impact of psychosocial factors on birth outcomes, in particular stress. Betty Neuman's stress theory model was used as the conceptual framework to examine the association between acculturation, stress, stress buffers (social support, coping and optimism) and birth outcomes (onset of labor and birth weight) among 62 pregnant women living in Western Michigan. Women were recruited through agencies offering maternal health services that included home visits. Data was collected during in-home interviews with subjects using standardized questionnaires in English and Spanish. Birth outcome data was obtained by follow-up phone interview. Interviewers were trained nursing students fluent in Spanish. Data analysis using SPSS has revealed strong correlations. Younger women were more highly acculturated, had higher distress and used avoidance as their main coping style. Women with high anxiety scores were at increased risk for lower birth weight babies and reported more difficulties with pregnancy. Further analysis of which variables have the most impact on birth outcomes is pending. These important findings may be utilized to improve prenatal services offered to Mexican and Mexican American women in the areas of social support and coping. Nurses need to preserve traditional coping styles and encourage social support of women during pregnancy for optimal birth outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:17:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:17:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.