2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159738
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Workplace Bullying and Normalization of Bullying Acts in the Nursing Workplace
Abstract:
Workplace Bullying and Normalization of Bullying Acts in the Nursing Workplace
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Chipps, Esther, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Ohio State University Medical Center
Title:Department of Nursing Quality and Translational Research
Contact Address:410 West 10th Ave, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA
Contact Telephone:614-293-7407
Co-Authors:E. Chipps, J. Mansfield, Nursing Quality and Translational Research, Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, OH; M. McRury, Educational Development and Resources, Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus , OH; J. Pestrue, Customer Service De
Workplace bullying has negative ramifications in the nursing workplace. The purpose of this descriptive cross-sectional study is to: 1. Describe the prevalence of workplace bullying among staff working on two hospital units. 2. Determine if there are differing experiences of workplace bullying by unit of employment, job title, gender, race and years of experience. 3. Examine the relationship between workplace bullying, job satisfaction and job stress. Hutchinson's model (2008) of Bullying in the Nursing Workplace is the theoretical model guiding this research(Hutchinson et. al, 2008). Data were collected from RNs, LPNs, PCAs and UCAs from two nursing units using a 41 item survey which included demographics, the Negative Acts Questionnaire (NAQ), and items related to job satisfaction. Descriptive and non-parametric statistics were used. Using a checklist of bullying behaviors (NAQ), 21% of subjects met the criteria for having been bullied, although in contrast when given the definition of bullying, only 7% of subjects indicated that they had been bullied. No differences were found in the experience of bullying by length of employment, job title, gender, or race. One unit experienced a significantly higher bully score. There was a significant negative correlation between bullying and job satisfaction. Thirty-six percent of subjects witnessed co-workers being bullied. Witnesses reported lower job satisfaction and higher stress. The bullying score for our subjects was higher than reported in a large sample of US workers (Lutgen-Sandvik et. al., 2007). We conclude that workplace bullying may be a greater problem in the nursing work environment than other occupations. Moreover, those who witness bullying may become secondary targets. We suggest that bullying may be a function of the dynamics of the unit team and organizational tolerance rather than demographic differences among employees. Failure of staff to recognize they are experiencing bullying may be a function of normalization of bullying within work teams. Organizational policies aimed at eliminating bullying are insufficient. The elimination of bullying must occur through interventions designed at understanding organizational antecedents, the normalization process and teamwork dynamics.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWorkplace Bullying and Normalization of Bullying Acts in the Nursing Workplaceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159738-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Workplace Bullying and Normalization of Bullying Acts in the Nursing Workplace</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chipps, Esther, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Ohio State University Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing Quality and Translational Research</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">410 West 10th Ave, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">614-293-7407</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">esther.chipps@osumc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">E. Chipps, J. Mansfield, Nursing Quality and Translational Research, Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, OH; M. McRury, Educational Development and Resources, Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus , OH; J. Pestrue, Customer Service De</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Workplace bullying has negative ramifications in the nursing workplace. The purpose of this descriptive cross-sectional study is to: 1. Describe the prevalence of workplace bullying among staff working on two hospital units. 2. Determine if there are differing experiences of workplace bullying by unit of employment, job title, gender, race and years of experience. 3. Examine the relationship between workplace bullying, job satisfaction and job stress. Hutchinson's model (2008) of Bullying in the Nursing Workplace is the theoretical model guiding this research(Hutchinson et. al, 2008). Data were collected from RNs, LPNs, PCAs and UCAs from two nursing units using a 41 item survey which included demographics, the Negative Acts Questionnaire (NAQ), and items related to job satisfaction. Descriptive and non-parametric statistics were used. Using a checklist of bullying behaviors (NAQ), 21% of subjects met the criteria for having been bullied, although in contrast when given the definition of bullying, only 7% of subjects indicated that they had been bullied. No differences were found in the experience of bullying by length of employment, job title, gender, or race. One unit experienced a significantly higher bully score. There was a significant negative correlation between bullying and job satisfaction. Thirty-six percent of subjects witnessed co-workers being bullied. Witnesses reported lower job satisfaction and higher stress. The bullying score for our subjects was higher than reported in a large sample of US workers (Lutgen-Sandvik et. al., 2007). We conclude that workplace bullying may be a greater problem in the nursing work environment than other occupations. Moreover, those who witness bullying may become secondary targets. We suggest that bullying may be a function of the dynamics of the unit team and organizational tolerance rather than demographic differences among employees. Failure of staff to recognize they are experiencing bullying may be a function of normalization of bullying within work teams. Organizational policies aimed at eliminating bullying are insufficient. The elimination of bullying must occur through interventions designed at understanding organizational antecedents, the normalization process and teamwork dynamics.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:17:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:17:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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