2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159739
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Misclassification of Obesity by BMI in Young Women
Abstract:
Misclassification of Obesity by BMI in Young Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Clark, Kathleen, PhD, RN, ARNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:424 NB, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA
Contact Telephone:319 335 7038
Co-Authors:K. Clark, Y. Powell-Young, College of Nursing, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA;
Background. Body Mass Index (BMI) is an imprecise measure of fatness overestimating obesity in athletes and shorter people. However, the general consensus is that BMI adequately represents most people and is the recommended way to estimate risk for disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of BMI in representing fatness in groups of young women with differing levels of lean and fat mass, and to describe the potential impact of the misclassification on two adipocytokines, C-Reactive Protein (CRP) and human interleukin 6 (IL-6). Methods. Fat mass and lean mass were measured using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in 323 healthy women aged 18 to 35. BMI was calculated as weight (kg) / height (m2). The ratio of peripheral body fat (fat ratio) was computed by dividing the body fat in the DXA trunk region by the body fat of the arms, hips and legs. CRP and IL-6 were assayed in duplicate using sandwich enzyme immunoassay techniques. Women were categorized based on fat mass adjusted for height, and lean mass adjusted for height, by dichotomizing fat and lean mass along the median for each variable. This created four groups: high fat/high lean group (HFHL); high fat/low lean group (HFLL); low fat/high lean (LFHL) and low fat/low lean (LFLL). Results. Median BMI in the HFHL was 31.7, significantly greater than the median value of 25.5 observed in the HFLL (p=0.001). However, there was no significant difference in the median percent body fat between the two groups (HFHL=45.9%; HFLL=43.3%), nor was there a difference in fat ratio. Median CRP values were significantly higher in the HFHL group (2.9 mg/l) as compared to the HFLL group (1.64 mg/l). There was no significant difference in IL-6. Median BMI in the LFHL group (22.9) was significantly larger than the LFLL group (20.8), while percent fat was significantly lower in the LFHL (29.0 %) as compared to the LFLL (31.4 %). CRP and IL6 were not different between the two lower fat groups, but were significantly lower than those observed in the two higher fat groups. Conclusion. This data suggests that BMI may misclassify young women with lower muscle and higher fat mass as normal when their fat mass would classify them as obese.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMisclassification of Obesity by BMI in Young Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159739-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Misclassification of Obesity by BMI in Young Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Clark, Kathleen, PhD, RN, ARNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">424 NB, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">319 335 7038</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mary-clark@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K. Clark, Y. Powell-Young, College of Nursing, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background. Body Mass Index (BMI) is an imprecise measure of fatness overestimating obesity in athletes and shorter people. However, the general consensus is that BMI adequately represents most people and is the recommended way to estimate risk for disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of BMI in representing fatness in groups of young women with differing levels of lean and fat mass, and to describe the potential impact of the misclassification on two adipocytokines, C-Reactive Protein (CRP) and human interleukin 6 (IL-6). Methods. Fat mass and lean mass were measured using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in 323 healthy women aged 18 to 35. BMI was calculated as weight (kg) / height (m2). The ratio of peripheral body fat (fat ratio) was computed by dividing the body fat in the DXA trunk region by the body fat of the arms, hips and legs. CRP and IL-6 were assayed in duplicate using sandwich enzyme immunoassay techniques. Women were categorized based on fat mass adjusted for height, and lean mass adjusted for height, by dichotomizing fat and lean mass along the median for each variable. This created four groups: high fat/high lean group (HFHL); high fat/low lean group (HFLL); low fat/high lean (LFHL) and low fat/low lean (LFLL). Results. Median BMI in the HFHL was 31.7, significantly greater than the median value of 25.5 observed in the HFLL (p=0.001). However, there was no significant difference in the median percent body fat between the two groups (HFHL=45.9%; HFLL=43.3%), nor was there a difference in fat ratio. Median CRP values were significantly higher in the HFHL group (2.9 mg/l) as compared to the HFLL group (1.64 mg/l). There was no significant difference in IL-6. Median BMI in the LFHL group (22.9) was significantly larger than the LFLL group (20.8), while percent fat was significantly lower in the LFHL (29.0 %) as compared to the LFLL (31.4 %). CRP and IL6 were not different between the two lower fat groups, but were significantly lower than those observed in the two higher fat groups. Conclusion. This data suggests that BMI may misclassify young women with lower muscle and higher fat mass as normal when their fat mass would classify them as obese.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:17:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:17:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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