2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159742
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Random Work Sampling Study of Clinical Nurse Specialist Practice in Acute Care
Abstract:
A Random Work Sampling Study of Clinical Nurse Specialist Practice in Acute Care
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Darmody, Julie, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:PO Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201-0413, USA
Contact Telephone:414-229-5558
Co-Authors:J.V. Darmody, College of Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI;
The work of the Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) has not always been visible to patients, nurses, providers, administrators, and policymakers. Purpose: The study purpose was to describe the work of the Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) in acute care using the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists (NACNS) model as a framework. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: The NACNS model describes CNS practice within three spheres of influence including patients, nursing, and the organization/system to promote quality cost-effective outcomes for a specialty population. Subjects: Study participants included 30 CNSs employed at four health care organizations in the Midwestern United States. Method: Multidimensional Work Sampling (MDWS) was utilized to collect data with random signals and a checklist based on the NACNS framework developed in a previous pilot study. CNSs carried the Divilbiss Random Reminder and recorded work activity and contacts on a checklist each time a random signal was received. Results: CNSs (n=30) self-reported 7,564 random work sampling observations during 518 work days and 4,216 hours. The proportion of CNS work time spent within each practice domain included patients (28.7%, Confidence Interval (CI) 27.7-29.7%), nursing (22.7%, CI 21.7-23.6%), organization/system (33.3%, CI 32.2-34.3%), and other activities (15.3%, CI 14.5-16.1%). The most common patient activities included interdisciplinary rounds and patient consultation. Nursing education was the most common activity with nursing personnel. The most frequent organization/system activities included committee meetings and quality improvement. The most frequent contacts during work activities included self (37.6%), group (22.5%), nurse (16.7%), patient (5%), and manager (5%). Conclusions: The NACNS model provided a useful framework for describing CNS activities, contacts, and time. Work measurement data can be utilized to describe and analyze CNS work activities, link activity to clinical and fiscal outcomes, and articulate CNS practice to multiple stakeholders.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Random Work Sampling Study of Clinical Nurse Specialist Practice in Acute Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159742-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Random Work Sampling Study of Clinical Nurse Specialist Practice in Acute Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Darmody, Julie, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201-0413, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414-229-5558</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">darmodyj@uwm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.V. Darmody, College of Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The work of the Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) has not always been visible to patients, nurses, providers, administrators, and policymakers. Purpose: The study purpose was to describe the work of the Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) in acute care using the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists (NACNS) model as a framework. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: The NACNS model describes CNS practice within three spheres of influence including patients, nursing, and the organization/system to promote quality cost-effective outcomes for a specialty population. Subjects: Study participants included 30 CNSs employed at four health care organizations in the Midwestern United States. Method: Multidimensional Work Sampling (MDWS) was utilized to collect data with random signals and a checklist based on the NACNS framework developed in a previous pilot study. CNSs carried the Divilbiss Random Reminder and recorded work activity and contacts on a checklist each time a random signal was received. Results: CNSs (n=30) self-reported 7,564 random work sampling observations during 518 work days and 4,216 hours. The proportion of CNS work time spent within each practice domain included patients (28.7%, Confidence Interval (CI) 27.7-29.7%), nursing (22.7%, CI 21.7-23.6%), organization/system (33.3%, CI 32.2-34.3%), and other activities (15.3%, CI 14.5-16.1%). The most common patient activities included interdisciplinary rounds and patient consultation. Nursing education was the most common activity with nursing personnel. The most frequent organization/system activities included committee meetings and quality improvement. The most frequent contacts during work activities included self (37.6%), group (22.5%), nurse (16.7%), patient (5%), and manager (5%). Conclusions: The NACNS model provided a useful framework for describing CNS activities, contacts, and time. Work measurement data can be utilized to describe and analyze CNS work activities, link activity to clinical and fiscal outcomes, and articulate CNS practice to multiple stakeholders.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:17:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:17:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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