The Effect of Cue Color and Familiarity on Place Learning in Aging: A Virtual Reality Experiment

12.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159743
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of Cue Color and Familiarity on Place Learning in Aging: A Virtual Reality Experiment
Abstract:
The Effect of Cue Color and Familiarity on Place Learning in Aging: A Virtual Reality Experiment
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Davis, Rebecca, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Grand Valley State University
Title:Kirkhof College of Nursing
Contact Address:301 Michigan St. N.E., 364 Center for Health Sciences, Grand Rapids, MI, 49503, USA
Contact Telephone:616 331 3079
Co-Authors:R. Davis, Kirkhof College of Nursing, Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids, MI; B. Therrien, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI;
Wayfinding becomes impaired in many people with age. Problems wayfinding can lead to getting lost and losing independence. People learn environments by creating a cognitive map (mental image) of environments based on environmental cues. One way to enhance environments to improve wayfinding is by the purposeful addition of salient cues. We hypothesized that colorful and familiar cues would improve place learning and that black white non familiar cues would have the poorest learning. Healthy men (n=24) and women (n=58) aged 55-85 (mean age 70 years) were recruited from the community. Pre-tests for visual acuity, cognition and working memory were conducted. Place learning was measured using a virtual reality task called the Computer Generated Arena. This task required subjects to use constellations of environmental cues to find a hidden platform in four computerized environments, which varied with respect to color (colorful versus black and white) and familiarity (recognizable objects versus abstract designs). Individuals were tested for 6 trials in each cue condition for three consecutive days. Place learning was measured as latency to find a hidden target. Linear mixed model analysis revealed significant effects of age group (F (2,75) = 13.169, p<.0001), cue condition (F(3, 2171)=3.84, p=.009), day (F(2, 3202)=11.95), p<.0001), direction sense (F(1,75)=5.558, p=.021) and trial (F(1, 3556)=22.283), p<.0001) on time to find the target. The younger age group (age 55-64) found the hidden target significantly faster than the oldest age group (age 74-90). Individuals in all groups performed the best in the cue condition with colorful and familiar cues, and the worst in the cue condition with the black and white and familiar cues. Subjects performed significantly better on day 3 than on day 1 indicating learning over time. These data show that older people can learn new places, but learning becomes slower with age. Cue properties, especially color, are important for saliency of cues and use in wayfinding. Colorful cues may help older people find their way and maintain independence.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of Cue Color and Familiarity on Place Learning in Aging: A Virtual Reality Experimenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159743-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effect of Cue Color and Familiarity on Place Learning in Aging: A Virtual Reality Experiment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Davis, Rebecca, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Grand Valley State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Kirkhof College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">301 Michigan St. N.E., 364 Center for Health Sciences, Grand Rapids, MI, 49503, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">616 331 3079</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">davirebe@gvsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">R. Davis, Kirkhof College of Nursing, Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids, MI; B. Therrien, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Wayfinding becomes impaired in many people with age. Problems wayfinding can lead to getting lost and losing independence. People learn environments by creating a cognitive map (mental image) of environments based on environmental cues. One way to enhance environments to improve wayfinding is by the purposeful addition of salient cues. We hypothesized that colorful and familiar cues would improve place learning and that black white non familiar cues would have the poorest learning. Healthy men (n=24) and women (n=58) aged 55-85 (mean age 70 years) were recruited from the community. Pre-tests for visual acuity, cognition and working memory were conducted. Place learning was measured using a virtual reality task called the Computer Generated Arena. This task required subjects to use constellations of environmental cues to find a hidden platform in four computerized environments, which varied with respect to color (colorful versus black and white) and familiarity (recognizable objects versus abstract designs). Individuals were tested for 6 trials in each cue condition for three consecutive days. Place learning was measured as latency to find a hidden target. Linear mixed model analysis revealed significant effects of age group (F (2,75) = 13.169, p&lt;.0001), cue condition (F(3, 2171)=3.84, p=.009), day (F(2, 3202)=11.95), p&lt;.0001), direction sense (F(1,75)=5.558, p=.021) and trial (F(1, 3556)=22.283), p&lt;.0001) on time to find the target. The younger age group (age 55-64) found the hidden target significantly faster than the oldest age group (age 74-90). Individuals in all groups performed the best in the cue condition with colorful and familiar cues, and the worst in the cue condition with the black and white and familiar cues. Subjects performed significantly better on day 3 than on day 1 indicating learning over time. These data show that older people can learn new places, but learning becomes slower with age. Cue properties, especially color, are important for saliency of cues and use in wayfinding. Colorful cues may help older people find their way and maintain independence.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:17:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:17:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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