2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159746
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Expert Evaluation of the 'Tribes Sharing Life' Intervention
Abstract:
Expert Evaluation of the 'Tribes Sharing Life' Intervention
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Fahrenwald, Nancy, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:South Dakota State University
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:Box 2275, Brookings, SD, 57007, USA
Contact Telephone:605-688-4098
Co-Authors:N.L. Fahrenwald, College of Nursing, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD; C. Belitz, A. Keckler, , SD Lion's Eye Bank, Sioux Falls, SD;
A disproportionate prevalence of type 2 diabetes and subsequent end-stage-renal-disease has resulted in a high need for kidney transplantation among American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN). Unfortunately, corresponding referral and consent rates for AI/AN cadaveric donors are low. College students are amenable to change in donation intent (signing a card or joining a registry); however, prior studies have not targeted racial or ethnic minorities. This purpose of this descriptive component of a community-based participatory research study was to design and evaluate a new intervention to promote intent to serve as an organ and tissue donor among AI tribal college students. The intervention, called "Tribes Sharing Life," was based upon the cultural traditions of story-telling and generosity and were derived the Transtheoretical Model of behavior change. Traditional music, prayer, personal interviews, local photography and historical cultural photographs were used to develop materials. The evaluation occurred in two stages. In the first stage, a community advisory council (n=12) evaluated the print and audiovisual materials using a modification of the National Cancer Institute's Educational Materials Review Form. Items in the expert evaluation met the < 3.0 mean criterion for acceptability. Revisions were made based on expert comments before stage 2. In the second stage, 15 tribal college students (age 19 to 34 years) evaluated the revised materials. The 9-item evaluation tool was adapted from our prior work. In the second stage, the mean evaluation scores for the print materials and the web-site met the a priori criterion to retain as is. Additional revisions were made to improve the cultural relevance of the language describing health, life and community values. This descriptive evaluation indicates that "Tribes Sharing Life" is a promising intervention to increase intent to be an organ donor for AI tribal college students and should undergo efficacy testing.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExpert Evaluation of the 'Tribes Sharing Life' Interventionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159746-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Expert Evaluation of the 'Tribes Sharing Life' Intervention</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fahrenwald, Nancy, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">South Dakota State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Box 2275, Brookings, SD, 57007, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">605-688-4098</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Nancy.Fahrenwald@sdstate.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">N.L. Fahrenwald, College of Nursing, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD; C. Belitz, A. Keckler, , SD Lion's Eye Bank, Sioux Falls, SD;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A disproportionate prevalence of type 2 diabetes and subsequent end-stage-renal-disease has resulted in a high need for kidney transplantation among American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN). Unfortunately, corresponding referral and consent rates for AI/AN cadaveric donors are low. College students are amenable to change in donation intent (signing a card or joining a registry); however, prior studies have not targeted racial or ethnic minorities. This purpose of this descriptive component of a community-based participatory research study was to design and evaluate a new intervention to promote intent to serve as an organ and tissue donor among AI tribal college students. The intervention, called &quot;Tribes Sharing Life,&quot; was based upon the cultural traditions of story-telling and generosity and were derived the Transtheoretical Model of behavior change. Traditional music, prayer, personal interviews, local photography and historical cultural photographs were used to develop materials. The evaluation occurred in two stages. In the first stage, a community advisory council (n=12) evaluated the print and audiovisual materials using a modification of the National Cancer Institute's Educational Materials Review Form. Items in the expert evaluation met the &lt; 3.0 mean criterion for acceptability. Revisions were made based on expert comments before stage 2. In the second stage, 15 tribal college students (age 19 to 34 years) evaluated the revised materials. The 9-item evaluation tool was adapted from our prior work. In the second stage, the mean evaluation scores for the print materials and the web-site met the a priori criterion to retain as is. Additional revisions were made to improve the cultural relevance of the language describing health, life and community values. This descriptive evaluation indicates that &quot;Tribes Sharing Life&quot; is a promising intervention to increase intent to be an organ donor for AI tribal college students and should undergo efficacy testing.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:17:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:17:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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