2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159748
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Feasibility of a School-Based Coping Intervention for Latina Adolescents
Abstract:
Feasibility of a School-Based Coping Intervention for Latina Adolescents
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Garcia, Carolyn, PhD, MPH
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:5-160 Weaver Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Contact Telephone:651-695-3149
Co-Authors:C. Garcia, J. Kemmick Pintor, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; S. Lindgren, El Colegio High School, Minneapolis, MN; S. Naughton, Health Start, West Side Community Health Services, St. Paul, MN;
Background: Latino girls (Latinas) experience higher rates of depression and suicidal ideation than other girls their age and Latino boys. Latina adolescents may benefit from preventive interventions that improve their ability to respond to and cope with life stressors. A coping intervention grounded in healthy youth development and health realization principles was developed for Latina adolescents. Purpose: Evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of a collaborative developed (nursing, education, social work) school-based coping intervention for Latina adolescents. Theoretical Framework: Resilience theory and health realization grounded in ecological model Subjects: Latina adolescents, 15-21 years old, were recruited from two urban schools to participate in a 14-week coping intervention. Method: Pre-post non-randomized feasibility study. Participants met weekly for a two-hour program, facilitated by two bilingual staff, consisting of dialogue, exercise, and skills-building. To assess feasibility and acceptability, weekly participation and attendance, instrument completion, and post-intervention focus group data were analyzed. Results: Twenty-one adolescents were successfully recruited (mean age 17). Eleven (52%) were of Mexican origin, 4 (19%) U.S. born and 6 (29%) from other Latin American countries; 7 (33%) arrived to Minnesota in 2007. Sixteen (76%) lived with their mothers; 13 (62%) did not live with their fathers. The fall semester intervention (n=10) occurred during school (72% attendance rate); the spring semester intervention (n=11) was held after school (84% attendance rate). Three (14%) dropped out. Three participants had limited involvement due to deportation issues involving themselves or a family member. Data were collected pre- and post-intervention. Focus group data demonstrate participant acceptability, "I liked the discussions" and skills gained, "...coping skills to control stress...you learn ways to lessen your stress then you learn to make your life a little easier." Conclusions: This coping intervention demonstrates feasibility and acceptability with Latina adolescents. A randomized controlled trial is warranted to examine intervention effectiveness.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFeasibility of a School-Based Coping Intervention for Latina Adolescentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159748-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Feasibility of a School-Based Coping Intervention for Latina Adolescents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Garcia, Carolyn, PhD, MPH</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5-160 Weaver Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">651-695-3149</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">garcia@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C. Garcia, J. Kemmick Pintor, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; S. Lindgren, El Colegio High School, Minneapolis, MN; S. Naughton, Health Start, West Side Community Health Services, St. Paul, MN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Latino girls (Latinas) experience higher rates of depression and suicidal ideation than other girls their age and Latino boys. Latina adolescents may benefit from preventive interventions that improve their ability to respond to and cope with life stressors. A coping intervention grounded in healthy youth development and health realization principles was developed for Latina adolescents. Purpose: Evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of a collaborative developed (nursing, education, social work) school-based coping intervention for Latina adolescents. Theoretical Framework: Resilience theory and health realization grounded in ecological model Subjects: Latina adolescents, 15-21 years old, were recruited from two urban schools to participate in a 14-week coping intervention. Method: Pre-post non-randomized feasibility study. Participants met weekly for a two-hour program, facilitated by two bilingual staff, consisting of dialogue, exercise, and skills-building. To assess feasibility and acceptability, weekly participation and attendance, instrument completion, and post-intervention focus group data were analyzed. Results: Twenty-one adolescents were successfully recruited (mean age 17). Eleven (52%) were of Mexican origin, 4 (19%) U.S. born and 6 (29%) from other Latin American countries; 7 (33%) arrived to Minnesota in 2007. Sixteen (76%) lived with their mothers; 13 (62%) did not live with their fathers. The fall semester intervention (n=10) occurred during school (72% attendance rate); the spring semester intervention (n=11) was held after school (84% attendance rate). Three (14%) dropped out. Three participants had limited involvement due to deportation issues involving themselves or a family member. Data were collected pre- and post-intervention. Focus group data demonstrate participant acceptability, &quot;I liked the discussions&quot; and skills gained, &quot;...coping skills to control stress...you learn ways to lessen your stress then you learn to make your life a little easier.&quot; Conclusions: This coping intervention demonstrates feasibility and acceptability with Latina adolescents. A randomized controlled trial is warranted to examine intervention effectiveness.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:17:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:17:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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