The Effectiveness of Strategies in the Behavioral Change Maintenance of an Exercise Program for Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159749
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effectiveness of Strategies in the Behavioral Change Maintenance of an Exercise Program for Women
Abstract:
The Effectiveness of Strategies in the Behavioral Change Maintenance of an Exercise Program for Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Gruys, Greta, BAN; Pursuing Masters Nursing
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Contact Address:5524 Warwick Place, Edina, MN, 55436, USA
Contact Telephone:507 581 6608
Co-Authors:G. Gruys, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN;
The benefits of exercise are numerous and go beyond the systemic effects of decreasing body habitus and lessening the likelihood of co-morbidities such as hypertension, diabetes, and heart disease. However, despite these well-known benefits most women are still not exercising. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, an alarming 78 per cent of the U.S. adult population do not exercise on a regular, sustained basis. Determinants and predictors of long-term behavioral change maintenance for women are indeed multi-factorial and complex. The overall purpose and intent of this literature review is to gain knowledge and understanding as to what strategies are most effective for long-term adherence of an exercise program for women. The methods towards obtaining the research articles utilized for this literature review was facilitated through the use of Medline (OVID) from 1996 to July Week 4 2008. Key search terms included exercise, women, adherence, patient compliance, health behavior, and health promotion. While there is not a generally accepted single strategy to promote long-term exercise adherence for women, there were several recurrent themes that emerged. Relevant findings reiterate the importance of familial support for women in adhering to an exercise program. Also found to be efficacious were the usage of pedometers, journals, and exercise logs as a means of being held accountable. Supervision through group exercise , exercise partners, and telephone calls were also beneficial in promoting exercise maintenance. Implications for practice of this study are significant for health care providers. Clinicians should be cognizant of gender-based differences that impact exercise attrition and adherence and incorporate these into formulating exercise programs for their patients. Recommendations for further research include greater diversity of female participants, evaluating the effects of exercise adherence across the lifespan, and including family counseling prior to initiation of an exercise program.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effectiveness of Strategies in the Behavioral Change Maintenance of an Exercise Program for Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159749-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effectiveness of Strategies in the Behavioral Change Maintenance of an Exercise Program for Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gruys, Greta, BAN; Pursuing Masters Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5524 Warwick Place, Edina, MN, 55436, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">507 581 6608</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">goer0100@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">G. Gruys, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The benefits of exercise are numerous and go beyond the systemic effects of decreasing body habitus and lessening the likelihood of co-morbidities such as hypertension, diabetes, and heart disease. However, despite these well-known benefits most women are still not exercising. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, an alarming 78 per cent of the U.S. adult population do not exercise on a regular, sustained basis. Determinants and predictors of long-term behavioral change maintenance for women are indeed multi-factorial and complex. The overall purpose and intent of this literature review is to gain knowledge and understanding as to what strategies are most effective for long-term adherence of an exercise program for women. The methods towards obtaining the research articles utilized for this literature review was facilitated through the use of Medline (OVID) from 1996 to July Week 4 2008. Key search terms included exercise, women, adherence, patient compliance, health behavior, and health promotion. While there is not a generally accepted single strategy to promote long-term exercise adherence for women, there were several recurrent themes that emerged. Relevant findings reiterate the importance of familial support for women in adhering to an exercise program. Also found to be efficacious were the usage of pedometers, journals, and exercise logs as a means of being held accountable. Supervision through group exercise , exercise partners, and telephone calls were also beneficial in promoting exercise maintenance. Implications for practice of this study are significant for health care providers. Clinicians should be cognizant of gender-based differences that impact exercise attrition and adherence and incorporate these into formulating exercise programs for their patients. Recommendations for further research include greater diversity of female participants, evaluating the effects of exercise adherence across the lifespan, and including family counseling prior to initiation of an exercise program.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:17:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:17:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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