Young Women Who are BRCA Mutation Positive and Cancer Free: Influences on Prophylactic Surgery Decisions

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159752
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Young Women Who are BRCA Mutation Positive and Cancer Free: Influences on Prophylactic Surgery Decisions
Abstract:
Young Women Who are BRCA Mutation Positive and Cancer Free: Influences on Prophylactic Surgery Decisions
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Hamilton, Rebekah, PhD RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois-Chicago
Title:Women, Children and Family Health Science
Contact Address:845 S. Damen Ave., MC820, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312-996-7942
Co-Authors:R.J. Hamilton, Women, Children and Family Health Science, University of Illinois-Chicago, Chicago, IL;
Young women (18-39 years) who receive a BRCA positive mutation test face decisions related to their increased risk for breast cancer and/or ovarian cancer. The purpose of this study (sub-sample of a larger study) was to determine prospectively what influenced decisions for or against prophylactic surgeries. Grounded theory was used to examine influences on decision making after receiving BRCA mutation test results. As part of a larger study (N=68), 20 participants were prospective relative to prophylactic surgery decisions: 12 participants were prospective for both prophylactic mastectomy (PM) and prophylactic oopherectomy (PO), 5 were prospective for PM, and 3 were prospective for PO. Influences prior to deciding on prophylactic surgery were examined using grounded theory analysis techniques. Most of these young women who had not personally experienced cancer struggled to decide what choice was best for them, whether to continue with increased breast and ovarian surveillance or to have prophylactic surgeries. However, if a close family member (mother and/or sister) had a breast cancer/ovarian cancer diagnosis the decision was more straightforward. Other issues such as discussions with health care providers, interactions with support groups and specific family situations were also influential. All of these young women sought to control their risk for what they perceived to be the inevitable development of cancer. Young women with a BRCA mutation have many interactions with health care providers, including nurses in various health care settings. Nurses can better assist these women if they are knowledgeable of the influences that impact their decision making.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleYoung Women Who are BRCA Mutation Positive and Cancer Free: Influences on Prophylactic Surgery Decisionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159752-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Young Women Who are BRCA Mutation Positive and Cancer Free: Influences on Prophylactic Surgery Decisions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hamilton, Rebekah, PhD RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois-Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Women, Children and Family Health Science</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">845 S. Damen Ave., MC820, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-996-7942</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hamilr@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">R.J. Hamilton, Women, Children and Family Health Science, University of Illinois-Chicago, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Young women (18-39 years) who receive a BRCA positive mutation test face decisions related to their increased risk for breast cancer and/or ovarian cancer. The purpose of this study (sub-sample of a larger study) was to determine prospectively what influenced decisions for or against prophylactic surgeries. Grounded theory was used to examine influences on decision making after receiving BRCA mutation test results. As part of a larger study (N=68), 20 participants were prospective relative to prophylactic surgery decisions: 12 participants were prospective for both prophylactic mastectomy (PM) and prophylactic oopherectomy (PO), 5 were prospective for PM, and 3 were prospective for PO. Influences prior to deciding on prophylactic surgery were examined using grounded theory analysis techniques. Most of these young women who had not personally experienced cancer struggled to decide what choice was best for them, whether to continue with increased breast and ovarian surveillance or to have prophylactic surgeries. However, if a close family member (mother and/or sister) had a breast cancer/ovarian cancer diagnosis the decision was more straightforward. Other issues such as discussions with health care providers, interactions with support groups and specific family situations were also influential. All of these young women sought to control their risk for what they perceived to be the inevitable development of cancer. Young women with a BRCA mutation have many interactions with health care providers, including nurses in various health care settings. Nurses can better assist these women if they are knowledgeable of the influences that impact their decision making.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:18:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:18:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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