2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159753
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Parental Support for The Human Papillomavirus Virus Vaccine
Abstract:
Parental Support for The Human Papillomavirus Virus Vaccine
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Harpin, Scott, MS, MPH
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota- Twin Cities
Contact Address:5-140 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Contact Telephone:612-626-0606
Co-Authors:S.B. Harpin, D.H. Bernat, L.H. Bearinger, M.D. Resnick, Center for Adolescent Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; M.E. Eisenberg, L.H. Bearinger, M.D. Resnick, Dept. of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapoli
Purpose: This study was designed to: (1) examine awareness and support for the use of the HPV vaccine among a representative sample of parents of school-age children, and (2) assess differences in parental support for the vaccine by demographic and personal characteristics using a population-based survey of households. Methods: A telephone survey was conducted with parents of school-age children aged 5-18 across the state of Minnesota. A total of 1605 parents agreed to participate (63% response rate). Chi-square tests and logistic regression were used to assess how support differed by demographic and personal characteristics. Results: The majority of parents (80.3%) had heard of the HPV vaccine. After a short clinical description of the vaccine, 81.1% said they would support its use, 12.6% said they did not support the vaccine and the remaining and 6.2% did not know whether they would support the use of the vaccine. The majority of parents supported the use of HPV across gender, parent age, child age, and education. Differences in support were found by race, ethnicity, religion, public school attendance, political orientation, income, and beliefs about the HPV vaccine. Multivariate analyses showed that believing that HPV vaccine encourages sex, public school attendance, political orientation and income were significantly associated with HPV support, after controlling for all other variables in the model. Race and religion were not significantly associated with support for the vaccine in the multivariate model. Conclusion: The decision to vaccinate a child and adolescent remains typically in the auspices of parents. Our findings show that an overwhelming majority of parents in this population-based sample support the use of HPV vaccine and don't agree that HPV causes a child to become more sexually active. As this is one of the first random sample, state-wide study of parents of school-aged children, findings from this study reiterate public support for HPV vaccine and CDC recommendations for vaccination of adolescent young women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParental Support for The Human Papillomavirus Virus Vaccineen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159753-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Parental Support for The Human Papillomavirus Virus Vaccine</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Harpin, Scott, MS, MPH</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota- Twin Cities</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5-140 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">612-626-0606</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">harp0083@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S.B. Harpin, D.H. Bernat, L.H. Bearinger, M.D. Resnick, Center for Adolescent Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; M.E. Eisenberg, L.H. Bearinger, M.D. Resnick, Dept. of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapoli</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This study was designed to: (1) examine awareness and support for the use of the HPV vaccine among a representative sample of parents of school-age children, and (2) assess differences in parental support for the vaccine by demographic and personal characteristics using a population-based survey of households. Methods: A telephone survey was conducted with parents of school-age children aged 5-18 across the state of Minnesota. A total of 1605 parents agreed to participate (63% response rate). Chi-square tests and logistic regression were used to assess how support differed by demographic and personal characteristics. Results: The majority of parents (80.3%) had heard of the HPV vaccine. After a short clinical description of the vaccine, 81.1% said they would support its use, 12.6% said they did not support the vaccine and the remaining and 6.2% did not know whether they would support the use of the vaccine. The majority of parents supported the use of HPV across gender, parent age, child age, and education. Differences in support were found by race, ethnicity, religion, public school attendance, political orientation, income, and beliefs about the HPV vaccine. Multivariate analyses showed that believing that HPV vaccine encourages sex, public school attendance, political orientation and income were significantly associated with HPV support, after controlling for all other variables in the model. Race and religion were not significantly associated with support for the vaccine in the multivariate model. Conclusion: The decision to vaccinate a child and adolescent remains typically in the auspices of parents. Our findings show that an overwhelming majority of parents in this population-based sample support the use of HPV vaccine and don't agree that HPV causes a child to become more sexually active. As this is one of the first random sample, state-wide study of parents of school-aged children, findings from this study reiterate public support for HPV vaccine and CDC recommendations for vaccination of adolescent young women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:18:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:18:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.