A Pilot Study Comparing The Effect of Two Implicit Memory Book Interventions on Self Identity and Quality of Life on Persons with Dementia

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159755
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Pilot Study Comparing The Effect of Two Implicit Memory Book Interventions on Self Identity and Quality of Life on Persons with Dementia
Abstract:
A Pilot Study Comparing The Effect of Two Implicit Memory Book Interventions on Self Identity and Quality of Life on Persons with Dementia
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Harrison, Barbara, PhD, GNP,BC
P.I. Institution Name:Oakland University
Contact Address:464 O'Dowd Hall, Rochester, MI, 48309, USA
Contact Telephone:248-370-3657
Co-Authors:B.E. Harrison, A. Whall, School of Nursing, Oakland University, Rochester, MI; A. Whall, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI;
Use of theory driven, effective behavioral interventions to care for persons with dementia is a challenge. The purpose of this pilot study was to compare the effect of two implicit memory book interventions on self identity and quality of life (QoL). Using personal photographs, memory books were designed to focus on either self identity (SI) or a vacation (control) in persons with dementia. The Preserved Implicit Memory Model served as the conceptual framework which posits that perceptual stimuli can preserve implicit memory and improve quality of life for persons with dementia. Methods: This randomized trial pilot study received approval in 2007 from the Institutional Review Board for Human Subjects protection. Six home dwelling persons with dementia and their family caregivers were recruited through senior centers. The memory book interventions were randomly assigned and viewed for at least 10 minutes, three times per week. Caregivers kept diaries of dementia subjects' responses to the intervention. Data on SI (Cohen-Mansfield, 2000)and QoL (Logsdon,et al 1999)were analyzed with t-tests and paired sample t-tests. Results: Mean age for dementia subjects was 85.2 years and mean MiniMental State Score (MMSE) was 13.6. Unfortunately, the groups were significantly different in number of years diagnosed with dementia, the SI group being diagnosed longer (M = 11 years). Although results did not reach significance (p = .05), when comparing the SI memory book subjects to the vacation memory book subjects on QoL scores, it was found that subjects viewing the SI memory book reported higher QoL scores (M=38.67; SD=5.0) compared to vacation viewing subjects (M=35.6; SD=10.7). Caregivers also reported that SI group subjects had higher QoL scores (M=36.0; SD=1.7) compared to vacation viewing subjects (M=29.3; SD=8.1). Perception of SI did not significantly change for dementia subjects although caregiver perceptions of dementia subjects' SI importance tended to decline. Caregiver diary entries provided qualitative information about dementia subjects' SI responses. Conclusion: Data trends support further testing of implicit memory interventions with a larger but more homogeneous sample of moderate to severe stage dementia patients. Funding from AANP Foundation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Pilot Study Comparing The Effect of Two Implicit Memory Book Interventions on Self Identity and Quality of Life on Persons with Dementiaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159755-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Pilot Study Comparing The Effect of Two Implicit Memory Book Interventions on Self Identity and Quality of Life on Persons with Dementia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Harrison, Barbara, PhD, GNP,BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oakland University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">464 O'Dowd Hall, Rochester, MI, 48309, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">248-370-3657</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">harriso3@oakland.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">B.E. Harrison, A. Whall, School of Nursing, Oakland University, Rochester, MI; A. Whall, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Use of theory driven, effective behavioral interventions to care for persons with dementia is a challenge. The purpose of this pilot study was to compare the effect of two implicit memory book interventions on self identity and quality of life (QoL). Using personal photographs, memory books were designed to focus on either self identity (SI) or a vacation (control) in persons with dementia. The Preserved Implicit Memory Model served as the conceptual framework which posits that perceptual stimuli can preserve implicit memory and improve quality of life for persons with dementia. Methods: This randomized trial pilot study received approval in 2007 from the Institutional Review Board for Human Subjects protection. Six home dwelling persons with dementia and their family caregivers were recruited through senior centers. The memory book interventions were randomly assigned and viewed for at least 10 minutes, three times per week. Caregivers kept diaries of dementia subjects' responses to the intervention. Data on SI (Cohen-Mansfield, 2000)and QoL (Logsdon,et al 1999)were analyzed with t-tests and paired sample t-tests. Results: Mean age for dementia subjects was 85.2 years and mean MiniMental State Score (MMSE) was 13.6. Unfortunately, the groups were significantly different in number of years diagnosed with dementia, the SI group being diagnosed longer (M = 11 years). Although results did not reach significance (p = .05), when comparing the SI memory book subjects to the vacation memory book subjects on QoL scores, it was found that subjects viewing the SI memory book reported higher QoL scores (M=38.67; SD=5.0) compared to vacation viewing subjects (M=35.6; SD=10.7). Caregivers also reported that SI group subjects had higher QoL scores (M=36.0; SD=1.7) compared to vacation viewing subjects (M=29.3; SD=8.1). Perception of SI did not significantly change for dementia subjects although caregiver perceptions of dementia subjects' SI importance tended to decline. Caregiver diary entries provided qualitative information about dementia subjects' SI responses. Conclusion: Data trends support further testing of implicit memory interventions with a larger but more homogeneous sample of moderate to severe stage dementia patients. Funding from AANP Foundation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:18:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:18:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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