The Lived Experience of Depression and Coping: Perspectives of Depressed Males and Females and Their Spouse/Significant Other

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159761
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Lived Experience of Depression and Coping: Perspectives of Depressed Males and Females and Their Spouse/Significant Other
Abstract:
The Lived Experience of Depression and Coping: Perspectives of Depressed Males and Females and Their Spouse/Significant Other
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Jambunathan, Jayalakshmi, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin Oshkosh
Contact Address:800 Algoma Blvd, Oshkosh, WI, 54901, USA
Contact Telephone:920-424-1274
Co-Authors:J. Jambunathan, J. Witte, L. Cook, College of Nursing, UW Oshkosh, Oshkosh, WI;
Major depressive disorder (MDD) affects approximately 14.8 million American adults or 6.7% of the U.S. population over age 18, and is the second most common chronic illness seen in primary care. The lifetime prevalence of MDD is estimated at 7% to 12% for men, and 20% to 25% for women. Despite studies of the significant psychological burdens of depression, there is a paucity of qualitative research addressing the effects of MDD on both the patient and his/her spouse/significant other. The purpose of this study therefore was to explore and describe (a) the lived experience of depression and coping from the perspectives of depressed males and females and their spouse/significant other, and (b) how the Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) can help with depression. Parse's (1998) Human Becoming Theory provided the framework for this phenomenological study. A convenience sample of six males and four females diagnosed with MDD, along with their spouses/significant others comprised the sample. Data were collected through open-ended interviews, conducted jointly with the couple. Giorgi's (1995) approach of data analysis identified categories and subcategories. Main categories that emerged from interviews with the depressed males were (a) Diagnosis: What is it? (b) Coping: Pulling through; and (c) Treatment: Relief. Categories emerging from spouse/significant other were: Disbelief: What now? (b) Continuing on: Wishing for normalcy; and (c) Treatment: Relief. Main categories emerging from interviews with the depressed females were (a) Not realizing it was depression, (b) Accepting the depression, and (c) Treating the depression. Their spouse/significant other categories included: (a) A Lot of stress, (b) Be more understanding, and (c) Early diagnosis and treatment. Results indicated that symptoms of depression are often not recognized and treated early. APNs need to develop a rapport with their patients, and inform/educate them about early diagnosis and treatment options. Implications for further study include replication with a larger sample size, identify effective and non-effective coping mechanisms, and plan and implement more holistic approaches.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Lived Experience of Depression and Coping: Perspectives of Depressed Males and Females and Their Spouse/Significant Otheren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159761-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Lived Experience of Depression and Coping: Perspectives of Depressed Males and Females and Their Spouse/Significant Other</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jambunathan, Jayalakshmi, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin Oshkosh</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">800 Algoma Blvd, Oshkosh, WI, 54901, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">920-424-1274</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jambu@uwosh.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J. Jambunathan, J. Witte, L. Cook, College of Nursing, UW Oshkosh, Oshkosh, WI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Major depressive disorder (MDD) affects approximately 14.8 million American adults or 6.7% of the U.S. population over age 18, and is the second most common chronic illness seen in primary care. The lifetime prevalence of MDD is estimated at 7% to 12% for men, and 20% to 25% for women. Despite studies of the significant psychological burdens of depression, there is a paucity of qualitative research addressing the effects of MDD on both the patient and his/her spouse/significant other. The purpose of this study therefore was to explore and describe (a) the lived experience of depression and coping from the perspectives of depressed males and females and their spouse/significant other, and (b) how the Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) can help with depression. Parse's (1998) Human Becoming Theory provided the framework for this phenomenological study. A convenience sample of six males and four females diagnosed with MDD, along with their spouses/significant others comprised the sample. Data were collected through open-ended interviews, conducted jointly with the couple. Giorgi's (1995) approach of data analysis identified categories and subcategories. Main categories that emerged from interviews with the depressed males were (a) Diagnosis: What is it? (b) Coping: Pulling through; and (c) Treatment: Relief. Categories emerging from spouse/significant other were: Disbelief: What now? (b) Continuing on: Wishing for normalcy; and (c) Treatment: Relief. Main categories emerging from interviews with the depressed females were (a) Not realizing it was depression, (b) Accepting the depression, and (c) Treating the depression. Their spouse/significant other categories included: (a) A Lot of stress, (b) Be more understanding, and (c) Early diagnosis and treatment. Results indicated that symptoms of depression are often not recognized and treated early. APNs need to develop a rapport with their patients, and inform/educate them about early diagnosis and treatment options. Implications for further study include replication with a larger sample size, identify effective and non-effective coping mechanisms, and plan and implement more holistic approaches.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:18:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:18:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.