2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159762
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effort in Family Caregiving
Abstract:
Effort in Family Caregiving
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Juratovac, Evanne, RN, MSN, PhD(c)
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Contact Telephone:216 368-6688
Co-Authors:E. Juratovac, D.L. Morris, M.L. Wykle, FPB School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH;
Conceptualizing caregiving as work, family caregivers are the primary workforce providing care to older adults in the United States. Effort is using energy to balance demands of work and prevent adverse health outcomes. With stress process and demand control theoretical influences, the purpose of this research is to explicate and investigate effort in family caregiving; and to explore the relationship between caregiver effort and caregiver depression. Caregiving demands and adverse health consequences of caregiving, including depression, may be associated with varying amounts of effort experienced by caregivers. This descriptive correlational study builds on findings of a pilot study, in which caregivers described effort in focus groups and a questionnaire. A nonprobability sample of caregivers was recruited through posted flyers at public businesses and a multi-agency community site serving older adults and families. Eligible caregivers completed a mailed questionnaire that included visual analog scales (VAS) to measure physical effort, mental effort, emotional effort, and temporal effort; the "CES-D" to measure depressive symptoms; as well as scales to measure workload, coping; and caregiver self-assessed health. A qualitative item on the instrument prompted the caregiver to describe how effort is perceived in doing the work of caregiving. In methodological triangulation, VAS results were compared with qualitative analysis of self-described effort in caregiving. Findings, including bivariate correlations and descriptive statistics about the caregivers and their caregiving situations, will be reported. A multiple regression was performed to explore if background characteristics, effort, workload, and coping predict caregiver depression. Preliminary examination of relationships suggests that effort is statistically significantly associated with proxies of both caregiving demands and caregiving outcomes; and that high effort may be associated with more depressive symptoms in caregivers. Recruitment continues to examine these relationships with higher statistical power. The information gained from this research has the potential to guide nurses in preventive physical and mental health care of the nation's family caregiver workforce.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffort in Family Caregivingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159762-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effort in Family Caregiving</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Juratovac, Evanne, RN, MSN, PhD(c)</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216 368-6688</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">evanne.juratovac@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">E. Juratovac, D.L. Morris, M.L. Wykle, FPB School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Conceptualizing caregiving as work, family caregivers are the primary workforce providing care to older adults in the United States. Effort is using energy to balance demands of work and prevent adverse health outcomes. With stress process and demand control theoretical influences, the purpose of this research is to explicate and investigate effort in family caregiving; and to explore the relationship between caregiver effort and caregiver depression. Caregiving demands and adverse health consequences of caregiving, including depression, may be associated with varying amounts of effort experienced by caregivers. This descriptive correlational study builds on findings of a pilot study, in which caregivers described effort in focus groups and a questionnaire. A nonprobability sample of caregivers was recruited through posted flyers at public businesses and a multi-agency community site serving older adults and families. Eligible caregivers completed a mailed questionnaire that included visual analog scales (VAS) to measure physical effort, mental effort, emotional effort, and temporal effort; the &quot;CES-D&quot; to measure depressive symptoms; as well as scales to measure workload, coping; and caregiver self-assessed health. A qualitative item on the instrument prompted the caregiver to describe how effort is perceived in doing the work of caregiving. In methodological triangulation, VAS results were compared with qualitative analysis of self-described effort in caregiving. Findings, including bivariate correlations and descriptive statistics about the caregivers and their caregiving situations, will be reported. A multiple regression was performed to explore if background characteristics, effort, workload, and coping predict caregiver depression. Preliminary examination of relationships suggests that effort is statistically significantly associated with proxies of both caregiving demands and caregiving outcomes; and that high effort may be associated with more depressive symptoms in caregivers. Recruitment continues to examine these relationships with higher statistical power. The information gained from this research has the potential to guide nurses in preventive physical and mental health care of the nation's family caregiver workforce.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:18:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:18:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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