Accessing HIV-related Health care in resource limited communities: Lessons from HIV-infected women in Kenya

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159763
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Accessing HIV-related Health care in resource limited communities: Lessons from HIV-infected women in Kenya
Abstract:
Accessing HIV-related Health care in resource limited communities: Lessons from HIV-infected women in Kenya
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Kako, Peninnah, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:P.O Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA
Contact Telephone:414-229 6238
Co-Authors:P.M. Kako, P.E. Stevens, College of Nursing, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI;
Background: Increasing access to HIV-related health care is of great importance in efforts to scale up HIV treatment access in resource limited countries. HIV/AIDS is a global pandemic. Currently, it is estimated that 33.2 million people are now living with HIV/AIDS globally. In sub-Saharan Africa, women bear the brunt of the HIV/AIDS pandemic. In Kenya, HIV prevalence in 2008 increased to 7.8 from 6.7 in 2003. Women are the most affected, with infection rates being 2-3 times higher that that of their male counterparts. These rates are even higher among younger women. Studies that focus on health needs of HIV-infected women in Kenya are needed and necessary. Purpose: This study sought to identify health needs HIV-infected women in Kenya grapple with. Methods: Forty HIV-infected women in Kenya (20 rural-Eastern Province, and 20 urban-Nairobi area) participated in this qualitative narrative study. Cross sectional unstructured in-depth interviews were conducted to elicit the stories of HIV-infected women as they described their health needs. Interviews were conducted in Kamba, Swahili, and English, tape-recorded, transcribed, and translated into English. Data were managed using N-vivo qualitative analysis software. Multi-stage narrative analysis was used to explore emergent themes from the women's narratives. Findings: Participants mean age was 37 years. Majority of the participants were poor with incomes being below the international poverty line of less than 1$ per day. Mode of transmission was mainly heterosexual and the mean number of years since diagnosis was 3 years. Narrations from women described various entry points to the health care system and their search for acceptable HIV care. Women described times of prolonged, recurrent illnesses suffered by spouses, the women themselves, and their children. Their health care journeys were burdened by excess overt and covert health care costs resulting in inadequate HIV care and limited access to ART. Women also reported problematic interactions with some health care providers. Despite their access difficulties, participants attributed tremendous benefits to HIV care and persevered to obtain and adhere to treatment. Traditional health care played an important role as well, especially for the rural woman.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAccessing HIV-related Health care in resource limited communities: Lessons from HIV-infected women in Kenyaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159763-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Accessing HIV-related Health care in resource limited communities: Lessons from HIV-infected women in Kenya</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kako, Peninnah, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">P.O Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414-229 6238</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pmkako@uwm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">P.M. Kako, P.E. Stevens, College of Nursing, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Increasing access to HIV-related health care is of great importance in efforts to scale up HIV treatment access in resource limited countries. HIV/AIDS is a global pandemic. Currently, it is estimated that 33.2 million people are now living with HIV/AIDS globally. In sub-Saharan Africa, women bear the brunt of the HIV/AIDS pandemic. In Kenya, HIV prevalence in 2008 increased to 7.8 from 6.7 in 2003. Women are the most affected, with infection rates being 2-3 times higher that that of their male counterparts. These rates are even higher among younger women. Studies that focus on health needs of HIV-infected women in Kenya are needed and necessary. Purpose: This study sought to identify health needs HIV-infected women in Kenya grapple with. Methods: Forty HIV-infected women in Kenya (20 rural-Eastern Province, and 20 urban-Nairobi area) participated in this qualitative narrative study. Cross sectional unstructured in-depth interviews were conducted to elicit the stories of HIV-infected women as they described their health needs. Interviews were conducted in Kamba, Swahili, and English, tape-recorded, transcribed, and translated into English. Data were managed using N-vivo qualitative analysis software. Multi-stage narrative analysis was used to explore emergent themes from the women's narratives. Findings: Participants mean age was 37 years. Majority of the participants were poor with incomes being below the international poverty line of less than 1$ per day. Mode of transmission was mainly heterosexual and the mean number of years since diagnosis was 3 years. Narrations from women described various entry points to the health care system and their search for acceptable HIV care. Women described times of prolonged, recurrent illnesses suffered by spouses, the women themselves, and their children. Their health care journeys were burdened by excess overt and covert health care costs resulting in inadequate HIV care and limited access to ART. Women also reported problematic interactions with some health care providers. Despite their access difficulties, participants attributed tremendous benefits to HIV care and persevered to obtain and adhere to treatment. Traditional health care played an important role as well, especially for the rural woman.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:18:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:18:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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