Gender and Acculturation Influences on AAPI Adolescents' Interactions with Their Mothers and Their Sexual Initiation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159764
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Gender and Acculturation Influences on AAPI Adolescents' Interactions with Their Mothers and Their Sexual Initiation
Abstract:
Gender and Acculturation Influences on AAPI Adolescents' Interactions with Their Mothers and Their Sexual Initiation
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Kao, Tsui-Sui, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:400 N. Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-5482, USA
Contact Telephone:734-647-0147
Co-Authors:T. Kao , C. Loveland-Cherry, School of Nursing , University of Michigan , Ann arbor , MI;
Purpose: The relationships among Asian American Pacific Islanders (AAPI) adolescents' gender, acculturation, maternal influences and their sexual initiation remain unclear. This study examined gender and acculturation influences on AAPI adolescents' interactions with their mothers and their sexual onset. Method: A secondary analysis of Waves 1 and 2 data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add health) was conducted to compare gender difference and to evaluate acculturation influences using a covariate model. A comparative analysis of data from 433 AAPI adolescents (223 males; 210 females) between the ages of 15 and 17 (at Wave 1) and their mothers was conducted using structural equation modeling, specifically EQS 6.1 for Windows. Bronfenbrenner's Social Ecological Model guided the modeling and analyses. Result: The fit indices show that the models fit the data fairly well (Gender Model: S-B X2=25.33, 31df, N: males=223, females=210, p=.753; NFI=.926; RMSEA < .001; Acculturation Model: S-B X2=3.75, 4df, N=433, p=.442; NFI=.963; RMSEA<.001). The variances explained (R2) by the models were approximately 60% (Gender Model) and 40% (Acculturation Model). In the gender comparison model, the correlation between mothers' perceptions of sexual discussion and adolescents' perceived maternal sexual expectations (APMSE) at Wave 1 differed for adolescent males and females. The relationship was negative for AAPI adolescent females, and positive for males (path coefficients: .164, p<.05 for males; -.148, p=.06 for females). In the acculturation covariate model, English language spoken at home was positively associated with frequency of maternal sexual discussion, level of mothers' perception of connectedness, level of APMSE at Wave 1, and later sexual initiation at Wave 1. On the other hand, the adolescents' years of U.S. residence were positively associated with adolescents' level of perceived connectedness and later sexual initiation at Wave 2. Conclusion: Adolescents' gender and their level of acculturation influence how they interacted with their mothers and how they perceived their mothers' sexual expectations. Interventions designed to delay AAPI adolescents' sexual initiation should consider gender and acculturation influences.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGender and Acculturation Influences on AAPI Adolescents' Interactions with Their Mothers and Their Sexual Initiationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159764-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Gender and Acculturation Influences on AAPI Adolescents' Interactions with Their Mothers and Their Sexual Initiation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kao, Tsui-Sui, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">400 N. Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-5482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734-647-0147</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">anniekao@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">T. Kao , C. Loveland-Cherry, School of Nursing , University of Michigan , Ann arbor , MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The relationships among Asian American Pacific Islanders (AAPI) adolescents' gender, acculturation, maternal influences and their sexual initiation remain unclear. This study examined gender and acculturation influences on AAPI adolescents' interactions with their mothers and their sexual onset. Method: A secondary analysis of Waves 1 and 2 data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add health) was conducted to compare gender difference and to evaluate acculturation influences using a covariate model. A comparative analysis of data from 433 AAPI adolescents (223 males; 210 females) between the ages of 15 and 17 (at Wave 1) and their mothers was conducted using structural equation modeling, specifically EQS 6.1 for Windows. Bronfenbrenner's Social Ecological Model guided the modeling and analyses. Result: The fit indices show that the models fit the data fairly well (Gender Model: S-B X2=25.33, 31df, N: males=223, females=210, p=.753; NFI=.926; RMSEA &lt; .001; Acculturation Model: S-B X2=3.75, 4df, N=433, p=.442; NFI=.963; RMSEA&lt;.001). The variances explained (R2) by the models were approximately 60% (Gender Model) and 40% (Acculturation Model). In the gender comparison model, the correlation between mothers' perceptions of sexual discussion and adolescents' perceived maternal sexual expectations (APMSE) at Wave 1 differed for adolescent males and females. The relationship was negative for AAPI adolescent females, and positive for males (path coefficients: .164, p&lt;.05 for males; -.148, p=.06 for females). In the acculturation covariate model, English language spoken at home was positively associated with frequency of maternal sexual discussion, level of mothers' perception of connectedness, level of APMSE at Wave 1, and later sexual initiation at Wave 1. On the other hand, the adolescents' years of U.S. residence were positively associated with adolescents' level of perceived connectedness and later sexual initiation at Wave 2. Conclusion: Adolescents' gender and their level of acculturation influence how they interacted with their mothers and how they perceived their mothers' sexual expectations. Interventions designed to delay AAPI adolescents' sexual initiation should consider gender and acculturation influences.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:18:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:18:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.