2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159766
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Dietary Intake and Nutrition Education (DINE) Phase 1
Abstract:
Dietary Intake and Nutrition Education (DINE) Phase 1
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Kilanowski, Jill, Ph.D.
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:5783 Rushwood Drive, Dublin, OH, 43017, USA
Contact Telephone:614-560-1885
Co-Authors:J.F. Kilanowski, Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH;
Self-management of healthy child weight requires a parent-child partnership that may benefit from interventions targeting dietary intake. Past research with migrant farmworker (MFW) children showed 41% of children (6 -11 years of age) were overweight. MFW families reported low-very low (52%) household food security. Food group requirements, defined by MyPyramid were met in 50% of the children in milk and diary category; 30% in vegetables; 48% in fruits and grains; 66% in meat/beans; and 22% of children meet the complete US MyPyramid age/gender recommendations. This study is the first of a three-phase project: Dietary Intake and Nutritional Education (DINE) intervention. The purpose of Phase 1 is to increase knowledge in social determinants of MFW families that will direct creation of the DINE intervention. Research questions are: 1) What is the nutritional status of these Midwest Latino migrant farmworker children? 2) What factors influence their healthy dietary intake? 3) What is the relationship of mothers' food security, acculturation, self-efficacy, and parent characteristics on these children's BMI-for-age percentile? Mother-child dyads of cluster samplings from Midwest MFW camps are participants. Instruments include self-efficacy; acculturation scale; US Household Food Security Survey; culture-specific pediatric dietary survey; BMI; and a demographic questionnaire. In consideration of low health literacy levels, data collection will utilize PDAs. All materials are in Spanish/English. Interview questions on behaviors influencing dietary intake will provide a mixed-methods strategy. IRB approval has been received through expedited review. Data will be collected in summer 2008 and ready for conference presentation. Overweight children are at increased risk for diseases formerly associated with adults. Programs that address childhood dietary intake must involve parents to foster success. Parents are key players in environments that encourage healthy eating. The DINE intervention strives to create a culture-specific health promotion program and phase one data will provide direction for curriculum content.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDietary Intake and Nutrition Education (DINE) Phase 1en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159766-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Dietary Intake and Nutrition Education (DINE) Phase 1</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kilanowski, Jill, Ph.D.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5783 Rushwood Drive, Dublin, OH, 43017, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">614-560-1885</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jfk19@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.F. Kilanowski, Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Self-management of healthy child weight requires a parent-child partnership that may benefit from interventions targeting dietary intake. Past research with migrant farmworker (MFW) children showed 41% of children (6 -11 years of age) were overweight. MFW families reported low-very low (52%) household food security. Food group requirements, defined by MyPyramid were met in 50% of the children in milk and diary category; 30% in vegetables; 48% in fruits and grains; 66% in meat/beans; and 22% of children meet the complete US MyPyramid age/gender recommendations. This study is the first of a three-phase project: Dietary Intake and Nutritional Education (DINE) intervention. The purpose of Phase 1 is to increase knowledge in social determinants of MFW families that will direct creation of the DINE intervention. Research questions are: 1) What is the nutritional status of these Midwest Latino migrant farmworker children? 2) What factors influence their healthy dietary intake? 3) What is the relationship of mothers' food security, acculturation, self-efficacy, and parent characteristics on these children's BMI-for-age percentile? Mother-child dyads of cluster samplings from Midwest MFW camps are participants. Instruments include self-efficacy; acculturation scale; US Household Food Security Survey; culture-specific pediatric dietary survey; BMI; and a demographic questionnaire. In consideration of low health literacy levels, data collection will utilize PDAs. All materials are in Spanish/English. Interview questions on behaviors influencing dietary intake will provide a mixed-methods strategy. IRB approval has been received through expedited review. Data will be collected in summer 2008 and ready for conference presentation. Overweight children are at increased risk for diseases formerly associated with adults. Programs that address childhood dietary intake must involve parents to foster success. Parents are key players in environments that encourage healthy eating. The DINE intervention strives to create a culture-specific health promotion program and phase one data will provide direction for curriculum content.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:18:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:18:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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