Comparisons of Childbirth Experiences between Japanese and US Women: Preliminary Findings From a Tool Development Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159768
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparisons of Childbirth Experiences between Japanese and US Women: Preliminary Findings From a Tool Development Study
Abstract:
Comparisons of Childbirth Experiences between Japanese and US Women: Preliminary Findings From a Tool Development Study
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Kishi, Rieko, PhDc
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Contact Address:533 S. Cuyler Ave. #2, Oak Park, IL, 60304, USA
Contact Telephone:708-383-1337
Co-Authors:R. Kishi, B.J. McElmurry, , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;
Background. Childbirth is a phenomenon reflecting the sociocultural context of a particular country. Declining availability and accessibility of perinatal health care are emergent social concerns in Japan and the U.S. A large dataset to evaluate perinatal care based on lay women's voices is awaited for professionals to develop evidence-based practices and improve health care services for their clients in Japan. Purpose. To examine sociocultural context of Japanese women's childbirth experience, in comparison with that of U.S women using the "Listening to Mothers-II (LTM-II)" survey (2006). Conceptual framework. A conceptual framework for evaluation of primary health care for perinatal women was developed. Methods/Subjects. An American questionnaire, LTM-II, was translated and culturally adapted for the Japanese language and pretested with a total of 20 Japanese lay adult women: 15 early postpartum women who had given birth at a rural city hospital and five women who had given birth in an urban city in the last two years. Interviews took an averaged 64.1 minutes. Results. Qualitative comparisons of women's childbirth experience in the U.S. and Japan, supported by quantitative data, revealed that women's childbirth experiences strongly reflected their cultural values and social context. For example, compared to U.S. women, Japanese perinatal women overcame their worries by carefully performing healthy behaviors, accepting hardships such as labor pain, and constantly receiving assurance from health professionals and modern technology. On the other hand, cross-cultural universality of birthing women's experiences was found in many aspects of the child birth process. Conclusions. Preliminary findings indicate commonalities and differences between Japanese and U.S. women's birth experiences can be obtained using adapted LTM-II tool. Comparisons of U.S. and Japanese women's experiences with the health care system and society of each country contribute to an understanding of the various sociocultural contexts in the two countries.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparisons of Childbirth Experiences between Japanese and US Women: Preliminary Findings From a Tool Development Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159768-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparisons of Childbirth Experiences between Japanese and US Women: Preliminary Findings From a Tool Development Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kishi, Rieko, PhDc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">533 S. Cuyler Ave. #2, Oak Park, IL, 60304, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">708-383-1337</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">riekokishi@gmail.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">R. Kishi, B.J. McElmurry, , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background. Childbirth is a phenomenon reflecting the sociocultural context of a particular country. Declining availability and accessibility of perinatal health care are emergent social concerns in Japan and the U.S. A large dataset to evaluate perinatal care based on lay women's voices is awaited for professionals to develop evidence-based practices and improve health care services for their clients in Japan. Purpose. To examine sociocultural context of Japanese women's childbirth experience, in comparison with that of U.S women using the &quot;Listening to Mothers-II (LTM-II)&quot; survey (2006). Conceptual framework. A conceptual framework for evaluation of primary health care for perinatal women was developed. Methods/Subjects. An American questionnaire, LTM-II, was translated and culturally adapted for the Japanese language and pretested with a total of 20 Japanese lay adult women: 15 early postpartum women who had given birth at a rural city hospital and five women who had given birth in an urban city in the last two years. Interviews took an averaged 64.1 minutes. Results. Qualitative comparisons of women's childbirth experience in the U.S. and Japan, supported by quantitative data, revealed that women's childbirth experiences strongly reflected their cultural values and social context. For example, compared to U.S. women, Japanese perinatal women overcame their worries by carefully performing healthy behaviors, accepting hardships such as labor pain, and constantly receiving assurance from health professionals and modern technology. On the other hand, cross-cultural universality of birthing women's experiences was found in many aspects of the child birth process. Conclusions. Preliminary findings indicate commonalities and differences between Japanese and U.S. women's birth experiences can be obtained using adapted LTM-II tool. Comparisons of U.S. and Japanese women's experiences with the health care system and society of each country contribute to an understanding of the various sociocultural contexts in the two countries.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:18:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:18:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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