Needs Assessment for Blue Sky: Technology-Enhanced Chronic Care Management for Teens with Depression

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159769
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Needs Assessment for Blue Sky: Technology-Enhanced Chronic Care Management for Teens with Depression
Abstract:
Needs Assessment for Blue Sky: Technology-Enhanced Chronic Care Management for Teens with Depression
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Kossman, Susan, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Illinois State University
Title:Mennonite College of Nursing
Contact Address:Campus Box 5810, Normal, IL, 61790-5810, USA
Contact Telephone:309 438-2553
Co-Authors:S. Kossman, Mennonite College of Nursing, Illinois State University, Normal, IL;
Teenage depression decreases functioning and increases suicide, substance abuse and chronic mental illness risk, exacting significant costs on individuals and society. Depression and other mental disorders have been called the chronic disorders of American youth. Chronic illness requires management strategies that fit into peoples' daily lives. Not enough is known about effective management of depressed teens in community settings or how to ensure their safe transitions and care continuity between care settings. The purpose of this descriptive exploratory qualitative study is to determine teenagers,' parents,' and healthcare providers' needs related to 1) enhancing safe transitions between inpatient psychiatric and school / community care settings, 2) monitoring and managing depression at home and school, and 3) using technology to help manage depression. Theoretical support comes from the Chronic Care Model, a systems model aimed at improving chronic disease care through supporting the patient and provider with self-management, decision support and clinical information systems strategies. Up to 30 teenagers (14-19 years) and 30 parents of teens diagnosed with depression within the last two years are being recruited for survey or interview participation. This data will be added to that from 20 healthcare providers in inpatient and outpatient adolescent psychiatric and high school settings. Interview/ survey questions relate to participants' perceptions of barriers and facilitators to depression management, problems with transition and important content (information, monitoring and decision support) needed for self-management. Participants will comment on strengths, weaknesses, applicability and potential benefit of different technologies for depression self-management. Content analysis will identify themes and highlight similarities and differences between the groups. Findings of this study will be used to design, build and test an intervention comprising a suite of interactive technology tools for teenagers, parents and nurses to enhance depression self-management, decision support, communication, safe transitions and continuity of care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNeeds Assessment for Blue Sky: Technology-Enhanced Chronic Care Management for Teens with Depressionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159769-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Needs Assessment for Blue Sky: Technology-Enhanced Chronic Care Management for Teens with Depression</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kossman, Susan, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Illinois State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Mennonite College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Campus Box 5810, Normal, IL, 61790-5810, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">309 438-2553</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">skossm@ilstu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S. Kossman, Mennonite College of Nursing, Illinois State University, Normal, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Teenage depression decreases functioning and increases suicide, substance abuse and chronic mental illness risk, exacting significant costs on individuals and society. Depression and other mental disorders have been called the chronic disorders of American youth. Chronic illness requires management strategies that fit into peoples' daily lives. Not enough is known about effective management of depressed teens in community settings or how to ensure their safe transitions and care continuity between care settings. The purpose of this descriptive exploratory qualitative study is to determine teenagers,' parents,' and healthcare providers' needs related to 1) enhancing safe transitions between inpatient psychiatric and school / community care settings, 2) monitoring and managing depression at home and school, and 3) using technology to help manage depression. Theoretical support comes from the Chronic Care Model, a systems model aimed at improving chronic disease care through supporting the patient and provider with self-management, decision support and clinical information systems strategies. Up to 30 teenagers (14-19 years) and 30 parents of teens diagnosed with depression within the last two years are being recruited for survey or interview participation. This data will be added to that from 20 healthcare providers in inpatient and outpatient adolescent psychiatric and high school settings. Interview/ survey questions relate to participants' perceptions of barriers and facilitators to depression management, problems with transition and important content (information, monitoring and decision support) needed for self-management. Participants will comment on strengths, weaknesses, applicability and potential benefit of different technologies for depression self-management. Content analysis will identify themes and highlight similarities and differences between the groups. Findings of this study will be used to design, build and test an intervention comprising a suite of interactive technology tools for teenagers, parents and nurses to enhance depression self-management, decision support, communication, safe transitions and continuity of care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:19:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:19:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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