Barriers of Recruiting Chinese-American Adolescents to a HIV/AIDS Prevention Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159770
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Barriers of Recruiting Chinese-American Adolescents to a HIV/AIDS Prevention Study
Abstract:
Barriers of Recruiting Chinese-American Adolescents to a HIV/AIDS Prevention Study
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Lee, Yi-Hui, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Wright State University
Contact Address:College of Nursing and Health, 3640 Colonel Glenn Hwy., Dayton, OH, 45435-0001, USA
Contact Telephone:937-775-2676
Co-Authors:Y. Lee, F. Wang, College of Nursing and Health, Wright State University, Dayton, OH; A. Salman, School of Nursing, Tishreen University, Lattakia, SYRIAN ARAB REPUBLIC;
Chinese-American adolescents are in need to receive HIV/ AIDS preventive interventions and education as other ethnic groups of American adolescents. Researchers have suggested that developing culturally sensitive programs is important for HIV/AIDS intervention in adolescents. However, very few researchers have directly collected information related to HIV/AIDS preventions in Chinese-American adolescents. Moreover, information about the accessibility, feasibility, and barriers of recruiting Chinese-American adolescents who live in non-major Chinese-American clustered areas of the United States for HIV/AIDS related studies is absent. This lack of information inhibits the ability of health care professionals to deliver effective HIV/AIDS intervention programs for Chinese-American adolescents. The purpose of this study was to investigate barriers of recruiting Chinese-American Adolescents who live in Ohio to HIV/AIDS research. Chinese-American high school adolescents whose parents are both with Chinese cultural background were eligible to complete several self-administrated questionnaires and participate in this cross-sectional study. Snow-ball sampling method was used, and both adolescents and parents were approached by bilingual research assistants. Findings revealed that less than 40% of Chinese-American cultural organizations/groups in Ohio agreed to providing assistance for the recruitment. The rate of refusals among eligible Chinese-American adolescents was approximately 70%. About 50% of parents refused to give their parental consents although their children agreed to participate in the study. Barriers of the recruitment were related to: finding gate keepers, family dynamics of Chinese-Americans, conflict of the sensitive topic with Chinese culture, and unawareness of the HIV/ADIS risks. This study suggests that future studies focus on Chinese-Americans parents and leaders of the Chinese-cultural organizations/groups are needed for successfully approaching and delivering HIV/AIDS preventive programs to Chinese-American adolescents. Findings of this study may increases nurses' awareness of various barriers that may encounter when they conduct research or address HIV/AIDS related topics of Chinese-American adolescents in Ohio.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBarriers of Recruiting Chinese-American Adolescents to a HIV/AIDS Prevention Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159770-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Barriers of Recruiting Chinese-American Adolescents to a HIV/AIDS Prevention Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lee, Yi-Hui, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wright State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing and Health, 3640 Colonel Glenn Hwy., Dayton, OH, 45435-0001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">937-775-2676</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">w004yxl@wright.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Y. Lee, F. Wang, College of Nursing and Health, Wright State University, Dayton, OH; A. Salman, School of Nursing, Tishreen University, Lattakia, SYRIAN ARAB REPUBLIC;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Chinese-American adolescents are in need to receive HIV/ AIDS preventive interventions and education as other ethnic groups of American adolescents. Researchers have suggested that developing culturally sensitive programs is important for HIV/AIDS intervention in adolescents. However, very few researchers have directly collected information related to HIV/AIDS preventions in Chinese-American adolescents. Moreover, information about the accessibility, feasibility, and barriers of recruiting Chinese-American adolescents who live in non-major Chinese-American clustered areas of the United States for HIV/AIDS related studies is absent. This lack of information inhibits the ability of health care professionals to deliver effective HIV/AIDS intervention programs for Chinese-American adolescents. The purpose of this study was to investigate barriers of recruiting Chinese-American Adolescents who live in Ohio to HIV/AIDS research. Chinese-American high school adolescents whose parents are both with Chinese cultural background were eligible to complete several self-administrated questionnaires and participate in this cross-sectional study. Snow-ball sampling method was used, and both adolescents and parents were approached by bilingual research assistants. Findings revealed that less than 40% of Chinese-American cultural organizations/groups in Ohio agreed to providing assistance for the recruitment. The rate of refusals among eligible Chinese-American adolescents was approximately 70%. About 50% of parents refused to give their parental consents although their children agreed to participate in the study. Barriers of the recruitment were related to: finding gate keepers, family dynamics of Chinese-Americans, conflict of the sensitive topic with Chinese culture, and unawareness of the HIV/ADIS risks. This study suggests that future studies focus on Chinese-Americans parents and leaders of the Chinese-cultural organizations/groups are needed for successfully approaching and delivering HIV/AIDS preventive programs to Chinese-American adolescents. Findings of this study may increases nurses' awareness of various barriers that may encounter when they conduct research or address HIV/AIDS related topics of Chinese-American adolescents in Ohio.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:19:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:19:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.