How Nurses Manage Behavioral Symptoms in Older Adults on Geropsychiatric Units: A Pilot Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159771
Type:
Presentation
Title:
How Nurses Manage Behavioral Symptoms in Older Adults on Geropsychiatric Units: A Pilot Study
Abstract:
How Nurses Manage Behavioral Symptoms in Older Adults on Geropsychiatric Units: A Pilot Study
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Lindsey, Pamela, DNSc, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Illinois State University
Title:Mennonite College of Nursing
Contact Address:Campus Box 5810, Normal, IL, USA
Contact Telephone:3094387400
Co-Authors:P. Lindsey, Mennonite College of Nursing, Illinois State University, Normal, IL;
Psychotropic medications are commonly used on psychiatric units to manage behavioral symptoms but can have serious adverse effects which are known to have an even greater impact on older adults. A paucity of research has investigated the use of psychotropic medications or nonpharmacologic to manage behavior with patients hospitalized in psychiatric settings, particularly their use in elderly clients in geropsychiatric settings. In addition, little is known about psychiatric nurses' decision making regarding the management of behavioral symptoms with older adults on inpatient geropsychiatric units. The purpose of this exploratory descriptive pilot study was to better understand pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions and the decision making process that nurses use in the management of behavioral symptoms exhibited by older adults, hospitalized on acute care geropsychiatric units at two different geropsychiatric units in the Midwest. A retrospective chart review examined the documented use of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions to manage behavior. Semi-structured interviews of psychiatric nurses explored the decision making process nurses use to manage behavior. Quantitative data for the chart reviews was analyzed using descriptive statistics. Qualitative data from the nurse interviews was analyzed using basic content analysis. Results from this study better informs future research aimed at the development of an evidenced-based protocol that addresses the management of behavioral symptoms in older adults. This research will benefit the care of older adults in acute care psychiatric settings but can also be used as a basis for clinicians treating older adults with psychiatric disturbances living in independent or supervised settings.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHow Nurses Manage Behavioral Symptoms in Older Adults on Geropsychiatric Units: A Pilot Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159771-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">How Nurses Manage Behavioral Symptoms in Older Adults on Geropsychiatric Units: A Pilot Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lindsey, Pamela, DNSc, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Illinois State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Mennonite College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Campus Box 5810, Normal, IL, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">3094387400</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pllinds@ilstu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">P. Lindsey, Mennonite College of Nursing, Illinois State University, Normal, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Psychotropic medications are commonly used on psychiatric units to manage behavioral symptoms but can have serious adverse effects which are known to have an even greater impact on older adults. A paucity of research has investigated the use of psychotropic medications or nonpharmacologic to manage behavior with patients hospitalized in psychiatric settings, particularly their use in elderly clients in geropsychiatric settings. In addition, little is known about psychiatric nurses' decision making regarding the management of behavioral symptoms with older adults on inpatient geropsychiatric units. The purpose of this exploratory descriptive pilot study was to better understand pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions and the decision making process that nurses use in the management of behavioral symptoms exhibited by older adults, hospitalized on acute care geropsychiatric units at two different geropsychiatric units in the Midwest. A retrospective chart review examined the documented use of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions to manage behavior. Semi-structured interviews of psychiatric nurses explored the decision making process nurses use to manage behavior. Quantitative data for the chart reviews was analyzed using descriptive statistics. Qualitative data from the nurse interviews was analyzed using basic content analysis. Results from this study better informs future research aimed at the development of an evidenced-based protocol that addresses the management of behavioral symptoms in older adults. This research will benefit the care of older adults in acute care psychiatric settings but can also be used as a basis for clinicians treating older adults with psychiatric disturbances living in independent or supervised settings.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:19:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:19:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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