2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159776
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Complementary and Alternative Medical Practices for Old Order Amish Children
Abstract:
Complementary and Alternative Medical Practices for Old Order Amish Children
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Oldenburg, Angela, BA
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Iowa
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:1109 Weeber Circle, Iowa City, IA, 52246, USA
Contact Telephone:319-331-6303
Co-Authors:A. Oldenburg, T. Tripp-Reimer, College of Nursing, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA;
Background: Old Order Amish (Amish) families often use alternative medical practices. These culturally isolated communities seldom participate in health care research; thus little is known about health practices in the care of Amish children. Purpose: The purpose of this report is to describe health practices and health-seeking behaviors used by Amish families on behalf of children. Theoretical Framework: Arthur Kleinman's theoretical framework about the relationship between medicine and culture guides this study. Method: This is a descriptive secondary analysis of the Health Heritage Project conducted in 1987-1988. The purpose of the original study was to investigate illness manifestations and self-care practices of adults from ethnic backgrounds. Family members of 51 Amish families completed health calendars, which were semi-structured instruments that provided open space to fill in daily illness manifestations, health treatments, and the use of lay or professional health services. Previous analyses focused on adults, but the pediatric sample subset data have never been analyzed. Analysis: Descriptive statistics were used to describe categories of illness manifestations, health treatments, and the type and reason for seeking lay and professional health services for children by Amish families. Results: Preventive measures were the most commonly reported health practices used for children. Illness manifestations most commonly reported by these families included headaches, cold symptoms, and coughing. Although families sought health care from lay, professional, and chiropractic services, only 1% of all treatments motivated families to seek health providers outside of the Amish community. Implications: These findings underpin an ethnographic study of Amish children with genetic blood disorders, their families, and their health care providers. These studies are part of a program of research focused on the interface between a homogeneous faith-based ethnic group and biomedical health care for the care of children.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComplementary and Alternative Medical Practices for Old Order Amish Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159776-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Complementary and Alternative Medical Practices for Old Order Amish Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Oldenburg, Angela, BA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1109 Weeber Circle, Iowa City, IA, 52246, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">319-331-6303</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">angela-oldenburg@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">A. Oldenburg, T. Tripp-Reimer, College of Nursing, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Old Order Amish (Amish) families often use alternative medical practices. These culturally isolated communities seldom participate in health care research; thus little is known about health practices in the care of Amish children. Purpose: The purpose of this report is to describe health practices and health-seeking behaviors used by Amish families on behalf of children. Theoretical Framework: Arthur Kleinman's theoretical framework about the relationship between medicine and culture guides this study. Method: This is a descriptive secondary analysis of the Health Heritage Project conducted in 1987-1988. The purpose of the original study was to investigate illness manifestations and self-care practices of adults from ethnic backgrounds. Family members of 51 Amish families completed health calendars, which were semi-structured instruments that provided open space to fill in daily illness manifestations, health treatments, and the use of lay or professional health services. Previous analyses focused on adults, but the pediatric sample subset data have never been analyzed. Analysis: Descriptive statistics were used to describe categories of illness manifestations, health treatments, and the type and reason for seeking lay and professional health services for children by Amish families. Results: Preventive measures were the most commonly reported health practices used for children. Illness manifestations most commonly reported by these families included headaches, cold symptoms, and coughing. Although families sought health care from lay, professional, and chiropractic services, only 1% of all treatments motivated families to seek health providers outside of the Amish community. Implications: These findings underpin an ethnographic study of Amish children with genetic blood disorders, their families, and their health care providers. These studies are part of a program of research focused on the interface between a homogeneous faith-based ethnic group and biomedical health care for the care of children.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:19:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:19:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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