2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159779
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Intentions of Older Women Whose Helpers Had Advised Them to 'Be Careful'
Abstract:
Intentions of Older Women Whose Helpers Had Advised Them to 'Be Careful'
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Porter, Eileen, PhD, RN, FGSA
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:S424 School of Nursing, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA
Contact Telephone:573 875-5163
Co-Authors:E.J. Porter, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO;
Both daily hassles and major life events can influence psychological well-being (PWB) of older adults, although resilience is usually associated with adjusting to major life-events. Few scholars have described intentions linked to daily hassles faced by older homebound women. During a phenomenological study of the experience of reaching help quickly, 40 women (aged 85-98) took part in a series of open-ended interviews over 18 months. Contextual data about involvement of helpers in plans for reaching help quickly yielded two related sets of hassles: (a) perceived difficulty and risks of doing an activity and (b) serial conversations with helpers who had advised that the women take precautions or cease that activity to avoid a traumatic event like a fall. I used a descriptive phenomenological method to discern intentions relative to undertaking such activities in light of helpers' concerns. Findings included these intentions: convincing her that I can still do that safely, letting their warnings go in one ear and out the other, and getting it done my way because it is the best way. Such intentions reflected empirical intersections of the two types of hassles. All intentions were viewed as part of the phenomenon labeled deciding when to continue that activity against their advice. Intentions were influenced by (a) concurrence between a woman's risk appraisal and her view of the helper's risk appraisal and (b) her degree of reliance on that helper to continue living alone. Intentions varied depending on the activity involved and actual or speculative situations associated with doing the activity. In keeping with the method, I compared findings to standard definitions of resilience (ability, capacity, process, outcome, or resistance to risk experiences) and suggested ways to enhance the empirical validity of those constructs. I recommended that researchers who measure resilience also explore the intersecting hassles of (a) perceiving certain activities as difficult, as risk-laden or both and (b) being advised to be careful during those activities. Opportunities for older homebound women to talk with practitioners about such daily hassles could enhance PWB.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIntentions of Older Women Whose Helpers Had Advised Them to 'Be Careful'en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159779-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Intentions of Older Women Whose Helpers Had Advised Them to 'Be Careful'</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Porter, Eileen, PhD, RN, FGSA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">S424 School of Nursing, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">573 875-5163</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">PorterEJ@missouri.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">E.J. Porter, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Both daily hassles and major life events can influence psychological well-being (PWB) of older adults, although resilience is usually associated with adjusting to major life-events. Few scholars have described intentions linked to daily hassles faced by older homebound women. During a phenomenological study of the experience of reaching help quickly, 40 women (aged 85-98) took part in a series of open-ended interviews over 18 months. Contextual data about involvement of helpers in plans for reaching help quickly yielded two related sets of hassles: (a) perceived difficulty and risks of doing an activity and (b) serial conversations with helpers who had advised that the women take precautions or cease that activity to avoid a traumatic event like a fall. I used a descriptive phenomenological method to discern intentions relative to undertaking such activities in light of helpers' concerns. Findings included these intentions: convincing her that I can still do that safely, letting their warnings go in one ear and out the other, and getting it done my way because it is the best way. Such intentions reflected empirical intersections of the two types of hassles. All intentions were viewed as part of the phenomenon labeled deciding when to continue that activity against their advice. Intentions were influenced by (a) concurrence between a woman's risk appraisal and her view of the helper's risk appraisal and (b) her degree of reliance on that helper to continue living alone. Intentions varied depending on the activity involved and actual or speculative situations associated with doing the activity. In keeping with the method, I compared findings to standard definitions of resilience (ability, capacity, process, outcome, or resistance to risk experiences) and suggested ways to enhance the empirical validity of those constructs. I recommended that researchers who measure resilience also explore the intersecting hassles of (a) perceiving certain activities as difficult, as risk-laden or both and (b) being advised to be careful during those activities. Opportunities for older homebound women to talk with practitioners about such daily hassles could enhance PWB.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:19:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:19:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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